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Devanagari
BrahmiEXPERIMENTAL
aśanif. (in astronomy) a subdivision of the phenomena called ulkā-s View this entry on the original dictionary page scan.
caind. and, both, also, moreover, as well as (= , Latin que,placed like these particles as an enclitic after the word which it connects with what precedes;when used with a personal pronoun this must appear in its fuller accented form(exempli gratia, 'for example' t/ava ca m/ama ca-[not te ca me ca-],"both of thee and me") , when used after verbs the first of them is accented ;it connects whole sentences as well as parts of sentences;in the double ca-occurs more frequently than the single(exempli gratia, 'for example' ah/aṃ ca tv/aṃ ca-,"I and thou", );the double ca-may also be used somewhat redundantly in class. Sanskrit(exempli gratia, 'for example' kva hariṇakānāṃ jīvitaṃ cātilolaṃ kva ca vajra-sārāḥ śarās te-,"where is the frail existence, of fawns and where are thy adamantine arrows?");in later literature, however, the first ca-is more usually omitted(exempli gratia, 'for example' ahaṃ tvaṃ ca-),and when more than two things are enumerated only one ca-is often found(exempli gratia, 'for example' tejasā yaśasā lakṣmyā sthityā ca parayā-,"in glory, in fame, in beauty, and in high position");elsewhere, when more than two things are enumerated, ca-is placed after some and omitted after others(exempli gratia, 'for example' ṛṇa-dātā ca vaidyaś ca śrotriyo nadī-,"the payer of a debt and a physician [and] a Brahman [and] a river");in Vedic or Veda and even in class. Sanskrit[ ] , when the double ca-would generally be used, the second may occasionally be omitted(exempli gratia, 'for example' indraś ca soma-,"both indra- [and thou] soma-"; durbhedyaś cāśusaṃdheyaḥ-,"both difficult to be divided [and] quickly united");with lexicographers ca-may imply a reference to certain other words which are not expressed(exempli gratia, 'for example' kamaṇḍalau ca karakaḥ-,"the word karaka-has the meaning "pitcher"and other meanings");sometimes ca-is equals eva-,even, indeed, certainly, just(exempli gratia, 'for example' su-cintitaṃ cauṣadhaṃ na nāma-mātreṇa karoty arogam-,"even a well-devised remedy does not cure a disease by its mere name"; yāvanta eva te tāvāṃśca saḥ-,"as great as they [were] just so great was he");occasionally ca-is disjunctive,"but","on the contrary","on the other hand","yet","nevertheless"(varam ādyau na cāntimaḥ-,"better the two first but not the last"; śāntam idam āśrama-padaṃ sphurati ca bāhuḥ-,"this hermitage is tranquil yet my arm throbs"); ca-ca-,though-yet ; ca-na ca-,though - yet not ; ca-- na tu-(varia lectio nanu-) idem or 'm. the letter or sound ca-.', ; na ca-- ca-,though not - yet ; ca-may be used for -,"either","or"(exempli gratia, 'for example' iha cāmutra vā-,"either here or hereafter"; strī vā pumān vā yac cānyat sattvam-,"either a woman or a man or any other being") , and when a negative particle is joined with ca-the two may then be translated by"neither","nor";occasionally one ca-or one na-is omitted(exempli gratia, 'for example' na ca paribhoktuṃ naiva śaknomi hātum-,"I am able neither to enjoy nor to abandon"; na pūrvāhṇe nā ca parāhṇe-,"neither in the forenoon nor in the afternoon"); ca-ca-may express immediate connection between two acts or their simultaneous occurrence(exempli gratia, 'for example' mama ca muktaṃ tamasā mano manasijena dhanuṣi śaraś ca niveśitaḥ-,"no sooner is my mind freed from darkness than a shaft is fixed on his bow by the heart-born god", ); ca-is sometimes equals ced-,"if"(confer, compare ;the verb is accented) ; ca-may be used as an expletive(exempli gratia, 'for example' anyaiś ca kratubhiś ca-,"and with other sacrifices"); ca-is often joined to an adverb like eva-, api-, tathā-, tathaiva-,etc., either with or without a negative particle(exempli gratia, 'for example' vairiṇaṃ nopaseveta sahāyaṃ caiva vairiṇaḥ-,"one ought not to serve either an enemy or the ally of an enemy");(See eva-, api-,etc.) For the meaning of ca-after an interrogativeSee 2. k/a-,2. kath/ā-, k/im-, kv/a-); ([ confer, compare , Latin que,pe(innempeetc.); Gothic uh; Zend ca; Old Persian ca1.])
kāmamind. though, although, supposing that (usually with imperative) (kāmaṃ-na-or na tu-or na ca-,rather than exempli gratia, 'for example' kāmam ā maraṇāt tiṣṭhed gṛhe kanyā-- na enām prayacchet tu guṇa-hīnāya-,"rather should a girl stay at home till her death, than that he should give her to one void of excellent qualities";the negative sentence with na-or natu-or na ca-may also precede, or its place may be taken by an interrogative sentence exempli gratia, 'for example' kāmaṃ nayatu māṃ devaḥ kim ardhenātmano hi me-,"rather let the god take me, what is the use to me of half my existence?"; kāmaṃ-- tu-or kiṃ tu-or ca-or punar-or athāpi-or tathāpi-,well, indeed, surely, truly, granted, though - however, notwithstanding, nevertheless exempli gratia, 'for example' kāmaṃ tvayā parityaktā gamiṣyāmi-- imaṃ tu bālaṃ saṃtyaktuṃ-, rhasi-,"granted that forsaken by thee I shall go - this child however thou must not forsake";or the disjunctive particles may be left out ; yady-api-kāmaṃ tathāpi-,though - nevertheless )
naind. not, no, nor, neither (-, ) etc. etc. (as well in simple negation as in wishing, requesting and commanding, except in prohibition before an imperative or an augmentless Aorist [ see a. -];in successive sentences or clauses either simply repeated exempli gratia, 'for example' ;or strengthened by another particle, especially at the second place or further on in the sentence exempli gratia, 'for example' by u-[ see no-], ut/a-, api-, pi-, -, pi-or atha vā- ;it may even be replaced by ca-, -, api ca-, api vā-,etc. alone, as ;often joined with other particles, beside those mentioned above especially with a following tu-, tv eva-, tv eva tu-, ced- q.v, khalu- q.v, ha-[ see gaRa di-and ] etc.;before round or collective numbers and after any numeral in the instrumental case or ablative it expresses deficiency exempli gratia, 'for example' ekayā na viṃśati-,not 20 by 1 id est 19 ; pañcabhir na catvāri śatāni-,395 ;with another na-or an a- privative it generally forms a strong affirmation[ see ] exempli gratia, 'for example' neyaṃ na vakṣyati-,she will most certainly declare ; daṇḍyo 'sti-,he must certainly be punished ;it may also, like a-,form compounds [ see below]) View this entry on the original dictionary page scan.
nanuind. (2. n/a-+ nu-) not, not at all, never ; (interr.) not? is it not? = nonne etc. etc. (hence often =) certainly, surely, indeed, no doubt (especially in questions amounting to an affirmation exempli gratia, 'for example' nanv ahaṃ te priyaḥ-,am I not your friend id est certainly I am your friend [so also na ca-,there can be no doubt ],or to a request exempli gratia, 'for example' nanu gacchāmi- bhoḥ-,surely I may go , and even as a responsive particle exempli gratia, 'for example' akārṣīḥ kaṭamnanu karomi bhoḥ-,indeed I have made it ;with another interr. or an imperative = pray, please exempli gratia, 'for example' nanu ko bhavān-,pray who are you? ; nanūcyatām-,please tell ;in argument often as an inceptive particle implying doubt or objection,"now it may be said, well, but then"etc., especially in nanv astu-,or nanu mā bhūt-tathāpi-,well, be it so or not so-nevertheless) View this entry on the original dictionary page scan.
prakaraṇan. (asminn eva prakaraṇe-,"on this occasion"or"in this connection"; na ca prakaraṇaṃ vetsi-,"nor do you know what is the matter") View this entry on the original dictionary page scan.
tanm. propagation, offspring, posterity ([ tanvā t/anā ca-or tm/anā tānā-or tanve t/ane-(ca-),"for one's own person and one's children"])
tu na ca -- api tu- not -- but View this entry on the original dictionary page scan.
varamind. it is better than, rather than (in these senses varam-is followed by, na-, na ca- na tu-, na punaḥ- tad api na-or tathāpi na-,with Nominal verb exempli gratia, 'for example' varaṃ mṛśyur nacākīrtiḥ-,"better death than [lit."and not"] infamy";exceptionally with instrumental case exempli gratia, 'for example' varam eko guṇī putro ta ca mūrkha-śatair api-,"better one virtuous son than hundreds of fools" ; na hi-varam-,"by no mean - but rather") etc. View this entry on the original dictionary page scan.
(collateral form of5. i-) cl.2 P. () y/āti- (1. plural yāmahe- ; imperfect tense 3. plural ayuḥ- ; ayān- Scholiast or Commentator; perfect tense yay/au-, yay/ātha-, yay/a-, yay/uḥ- etc.; yaye- ; Aorist ayāsam-or ayāsiṣam-; subjunctive y/āsat-, yeṣam-, yāsiṣat- ; preceding yāsiṣīṣṭhās- ; future yātā- etc.; yāsyati- ; te- ; infinitive mood yātum- etc.;Ved. infinitive mood y/ai-, y/ātave-or v/ai-; ind.p. yātv/ā- ; -y/āya-, -yāyam- ), to go, proceed, move, walk, set out, march, advance, travel, journey (often with instrumental case or accusative of the way, especially with gatim-, mārgam-, adhvānam-, panthānam-, padavīm-, yātrām-) etc. ; to go away, withdraw, retire etc. ; (also with palāyya-) to flee, escape (with kṣemeṇa-or svasti-,to escape unscathed ) ; to go towards or against, go or come to, enter, approach, arrive at, reach etc. etc. (with accusative often followed by prati- exempli gratia, 'for example' with gṛham-,to enter a house;with ripum prati-,to march against the enemy;with mṛgayām-,to go out hunting;with śirasāmahīm-,to bow down to the ground with the head;with prakṛtim-,to return to one's natural state;with karṇau-,to come to the ears, be heard;with utsavād utsavam-,to go from one festival to another;with hastam- in fine compositi or 'at the end of a compound',to fall into the hands of;with patham-or gocaram- in fine compositi or 'at the end of a compound',to come within range of; especially with the accusative of an abstract noun = to go to any state or condition, become, be exempli gratia, 'for example' vināśaṃ yāti-,he goes to destruction id est he is destroyed; kāṭhinyaṃ yāti-,it becomes hard; dveṣyatāṃ yāti-,he becomes hated;similarly nidhanaṃ--,to die; nidrāṃ--,to fall asleep; udayaṃ--,to rise, said of stars etc.;sometimes also with locative case exempli gratia, 'for example' yāhi rājñah sakāśe-,go into the presence of the king ;or even with dative case exempli gratia, 'for example' yayatuḥ sva-niveśāya-,both went home ; na cātmane kṛpaṇasya dhanaṃ yāti-,nor does the wealth of the miser go to [i.e. benefit] himself. ; phalebhyo yāti-,he goes to [fetch] fruits Scholiast or Commentator) ; to go to for any request, implore, solicit (with two accusative) ; (with striyam-) to go to a woman for sexual intercourse ; to go to for any purpose (infinitive mood) ; often with adverbs exempli gratia, 'for example' with bahir-, to go out ; with adho-, to go down, sink ; with khaṇḍaśo- or dalaśo-, to fall to pieces ; with śata-dhā-, to fall into a hundred pieces ; to extend to (accusative) ; to last for (accusative) ; to pass away, elapse (said of time) etc. ; to vanish, disappear (as wealth) ; to come to pass, prosper, succeed ; to proceed, behave, act ; to find out, discover ; to receive or learn (a science) from (ablative) ; to undertake, undergo (accusative) ; imperative yātu-, be it as it may : Passive voice yāyate-, to be gone or moved : Causal yāp/ayati- (Aorist ayīyapat-), to cause to depart, cause to go or march, dismiss ; to cause to go towards (accusative) (see yāpita-) ; to direct (the gaze) towards (locative case) (varia lectio pātayati-) ; to drive away remove, cure (a disease) ; to cause to pass or elapse, pass or spend (time) etc. ; to live (pāli- yāpeti-) ; to cause to subsist, support, maintain ; to induce : Desiderative yiyāsati-, to intend or be about to go, desire to proceed etc.: Intensive īyāyate- (?) , to move ; yāyayate-, yāyeti-, yāyāti- grammar
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ardha अर्ध (Written also as अर्द्ध) a. [ऋध्-णिच्-अच्; according to Nir. from धृ, or ऋध्] Half, forming a half (divided into 2 parts); अर्ध-अर्ध the one half-the other half. -र्धः [ऋध्-घञ्] 1 A place, region, country; house, habitation (Ved.). -2 Increase (वृद्धि). -3 Wind. -4 A part, portion, side. -र्धम्, -र्धः 1 A half, half portion; पचाति नेमो न हि पक्षदर्धः Rv.1.27.18. सर्वनाशे समुत्पन्ने अर्धं त्यजति पण्डितः, गतमर्धं दिवसस्य V.2; पूर्वार्धः first half; so उत्तर˚ latter half; दक्षिण˚ southern half (half on the right side); so अवर˚, जघन˚, पर˚, ग्राम˚ &c.; यदर्धे विच्छिन्नम् Ś.1.9 divided in half; ऋज्वायतार्धम् M.27; R.3.59; 12.99; रात्रौ तदर्धं गतम् Bh.3.17; one part of two, apart, partly (Ved.); -2 Nearness, proximity; see अर्धदेव. (अर्ध may be compounded with almost every noun and adjective; as first member of compound with nouns it means 'a half of' and forms an एकदेशिसमास or तत्पुरुष; ˚कायः = अर्धं कायस्य; ˚पिप्पली, ˚मार्गः; ˚पुरुषः &c.; with adjectives, it has an adverbial force; ˚श्याम half dark; ˚भुक्त half eaten; so ˚पिष्ट, ˚पूर्ण &c.; with numeral adjectives it may mean either 'a half of' or 'with an additional half'; ˚शतम् half of 1 i. e. 5; or अर्धेन सहितं शतम् i. e. 15; with ordinal numerals 'with a half or that number'; ˚तृतीयम् containing two and the third only half; i. e. two and a half; so ˚चतुर्थ three and a half. cf. अर्धं खण्डे समांशके Nm. -Comp. -अक्षि n. side-look, wink. नगरस्त्रीशङ्कितार्धाक्षिदृष्टम् Mk.8.42. -अङ्गम् half the body. -अन्तरम् half the distance; ˚एकपदता a fault in composition; see S. D. 575. -अंशः a half, the half. -अंशिन् a. sharing a half. -अर्धः, -र्धम् 1 half of a half, quarter; चरर्धार्धभागाभ्यां तामयोजयतामुभे R.1.56. -3 half and half. -अवभेदकः 1 pain in half the head, hemicrania (Mar. अर्धशिशी). (-कम्) dividing in equal parts. -अवशेष a. having only a half left. -अकारः 1 half the letter अ. -2 N. of अवग्रह q. v. -असिः A sword with one edge, a small sword; अर्धासिभिस्तथा खङ्गैः Mb.7.137.15. -आसनम् 1 half a seat; अर्धासनं गोत्रभिदो$धितष्ठौ R.6.73; मम हि दिवौकसां समक्षमर्धासनोपवेशितस्य Ś.7 (it being considered a mark of a very great respect to make room for a guest &c. on the same seat with oneself). -2 greeting kindly or with great respect. -3 exemption from censure. -इन्दुः 1 the half or crescent moon. -2 semicircular impresion of a finger-nail, crescent-shaped nail-print; कुचयोर्नखाङ्कैरर्धेन्दुलीलैः N.6.25. -3 an arrow with a crescent-shaped head (= अर्धचन्द्र below.); ˚मौलि N. of Śiva तत्र व्यक्तं दृषदि चरणन्यासमर्धेन्दुमौलेः Me.57. -इन्द्र a. that of which a half belongs to Indra. -उक्त a. half said or uttered; रामभद्र इति अर्धोक्ते महाराज U.1. -उक्तिः f. a broken speech; an interrupted speech. -उदकम् water reaching half the body. -उदयः 1 the rising of the half moon. -2 partial rise. -3 a kind of parvan; ˚आसनम् a sort of posture in meditatiou. -उदित a. 1 half risen. -2 half uttered. -ऊरुक a. [अर्धमूरोः अर्धोरु तत्र काशते] reaching to the middle of the thighs. (-कम्) 1 a short petti-coat (Mar. परकर); see चण्डातक. -2 mantle, veil. -कर्णः Radius, half the diameter. -कृत a. half done, incomplete. -केतुः N. of Rudra. -कोशः a moiety of one's treasure. -कौडविक a. measuring half a kuḍava. -खारम्, -री a kind of measure, half a Khāri; P.V.4.11. -गङ्गा N. of the river Kāverī; (स्नानादौ गङ्गास्नानार्धफलदायिनी); so ˚जाह्नवी -गर्भ a. Ved. 1 in the middle of the womb; सप्तार्धगर्भा भुवनस्य रेतो Rv. 1.164.36. -2 N. of the rays of the Sun. -गुच्छः a necklace of 24 strings. -गुञ्जा half a gunja. -गोलः a hemisphere. -चक्रवर्तिन्, -चक्रिन् m. N. of the nine black Vasudevas and the nine enemies of Viṣṇu. -चन्द्र a. crescent-shaped. (-न्द्रः) 1 the half moon, crescent moon; सार्धचन्द्रं बिभर्ति यः Ku.6.75. -2 the semicircular marks on a peacock's tail. -3 an arrow with a crescent-shaped head; अर्धचन्द्रमुखैर्बाणैश्चिच्छेद कदलीसुखम् R.12.96. cf. अर्धचन्द्रस्तदाकारे बाणे बर्हे शिखण्डिनः Nm. -4 crescent-shaped nail-print. -5 the hand bent into a semicircle, as for the purpose of seizing or clutching anything; ˚न्द्र दा to seize by the neck and turn out; दीयतामेतस्यार्धचन्द्रः Pt.1. (-द्रा) N. of a plant (कर्णस्फोट). -चन्द्राकार, -चन्द्राकृति a. half-moonshaped. -चन्द्रकम् A semi-circular pearl. Kau. (-रः, -ति f.) meniscus. -चन्द्रिका N. of a climbing plant. (Mar. तिळवण). -चित्र a. Half-transparent; A kind of marble; अर्धाङ्गदृश्यमानं च तदर्धचित्रमिति स्मृतम् Māna.51.1. -चोलकः a short bodice. -जरतीयन्यायः a kind of न्याय, न चेदानीमर्धजरतीयं लभ्यं वृद्धिर्मे भविष्यति स्वरो नेति MBh.4.1. 78. See under न्याय. -जीविका, -ज्या The sine of an arc. -तनुः f. half the body. -तिक्तः N. of a plant (नेपालनिम्ब Mar. चिराईत). -तूरः a kind of musical instrument. -दिनम्, दिवसः 1 half a day, mid-day. -2 a day of 12 hours. -देवः 1 demi-god. इन्द्रं न वृत्रतुरमर्धदेवम् Rv. 4.42.8-9. -2 Ved. being near the gods; (देवानां समीपे बर्तमानः Sāy.). -द्रौणिक a. measuring a half droṇa. -धारः a knife or lancet with a single edge (one of the 2 surgical instruments mentioned by Suśruta). -नाराचः a crescent-shaped iron-pointed arrow; नाराचानर्धनाराचाञ्शस्त्राणि विविधानि च Mbh.2.51.35; गृध- लक्षवेधी अर्धनाराचः V.5. -नारायणः a form of Viṣṇu. -नारीशः, -नारीश्वरः, -नारी, -नटेश्वरः a form of Śiva, (half male and half female) cf.... पतिरपि जगता- मर्धनारीश्वरो$भूत् Sūkti.5.99. -नावम् half a boat. -निशा midnight. -पञ्चम a. Four and half; युक्तश्छन्दांस्य- धीयीत मासान्विप्रो$र्धपञ्चमान् Ms.4.95. -पञ्चशत् f. twenty five Ms.8.268. -पणः a measure containing half paṇa Ms.8.44. -पथम् half way. (-पथे) midway भृतिमर्ध- पथे सर्वान्प्रदाप्य Y.2.198. -पादः half a pāda or foot; अर्धपादं किष्कुविष्कम्भमुद्धृत्य Dk.19. -पादा The plant भूम्यामलकी (Mar. भूईआवळी). -पादिक a. having half a foot; सद्यः कार्यो$र्धपादिकः Ms.8.325. -पाञ्चालिक a. born or produced in the ardhapanchāla. -पारावतः a kind of pigeon (अर्धेनाङ्गेन पारावत इव). The francolin partridge. -पुलायितः a half gallop, canter; चित्रं चकार पदमर्धपुलायितेन Śi.5.1. -प्रहर half a watch, one hour and a half. -प्राणम् A kind of joinery resembling the shape of a bisected heart; मूलाग्रे कीलकं युक्तमर्धप्राणमिति स्मृतम् । Māna.17.99. -भागः a half, half a share or part; तदर्धभागेन लभस्व काङ्क्षितम् Ku.5.5; R.7.45. -भागिक a. sharing a half; मृते पितरि कुर्युस्तं भ्रातरस्त्वर्धभागिकम्म् Y.2.134. -भाज् a. sharing entitled to a half; अर्धभाग्रक्षणाद्राजा Ms.8.39. -2 a companion, sharer; देवानामर्धभागासि Av.6.86.3. -भास्करः mid-day. -भेदः Hemiplegia (अर्धाङ्गवायुः); Suś. -भोटिका a kind of cake. -भ्रमः -मकः a kind of artificial composition; for instances see Ki.15.27; Śi.19.72. The Sar. K. describes it as a figure of speech thus :-- आहुरर्धभ्रमं नाम श्लोकार्धभ्रमणं यदि. -मागधी N. of a dialect in which many of Jaina Canonical books are written. It is so named perhaps because many of the characteristics of Māgadhi are found in it. -माणवकः, -माणवः a necklace of 12 strings (माणवक consisting of 24.) -मात्रा 1 half a (short) syllable. अर्धमात्रालाघवेन पुत्रोत्सवं मन्यन्ते वैयाकरणाः Pari Sik. -2 a term for a consonant (व्यञ्जनं चार्धमात्रकम्). -मार्गे ind. mid-way; बन्दीकृता विबुधशत्रुभिरर्धमार्गे V.1.3. -मासः half a month, a fortnight. -मासतम = ˚मासिक see P.V.2.57. -मासिक a. 1 happening every fortnight. -2 lasting for a fortnight; ये$र्धमासाश्च च मासाश्च Mahānārā. 25. Y.2.177. -मुष्टिः f. a half-clenched hand. -यामः half a watch. -रथः [अर्धः असंपूर्णः रथः रथी] a warrior who fights on a car with another (who is not so skilled as a रथी); रणे रणे$भिमानी च विमुखश्चापि दृश्यते । घृणी कर्णः प्रमादी च तेन मे$र्धरथो मतः Mb. -रात्रः [अर्ध रात्रेः] 1 midnight; अथार्धरात्रे स्तिमितप्रदीपे R.16.4; स्थिते$र्धरात्रे Dk.19. -2 a night containing half a whole day of 24 hours. -रात्रार्धदिवसः equinox. -लभ्मीहरिः Hari having a form half like Lakṣmī. -विसर्गः, -विसर्ज- नीयः the Visarga sound before क्, ख्, प्, and फ्, so called because its sign () is the half of a Visarga (). -वीक्षणम् a side-look, glance, leer. -वृद्ध a. middle-aged. -वृद्धिः The half of the interest or rent; Ms.8.15. -वैनाशिकः N. of the followers of Kaṇāda (arguing half perishableness). -वैशसम् half or incomplete murder; विधिना कृतमर्धवैशसं ननु मां कामवधे विमुञ्चता Ku.4.31. -व्यासः the radius of a circle. -शतम् 1 fifty. -2 One hundred and fifty; Ms.8.267. -शनम् [अर्धमशनस्य शकन्ध्वा˚] half a meal. -शफरः a kind of fish. -शब्द a. having a low voice. -शेष a. having only a half left. -श्याम a. half clouded. -श्लोकः half a śloka or verse. -सम a. equal to a half. (-मम्) N. of a class of metres in which the 1st and 3rd and 2nd and 4th lines have the same syllables and Gaṇas; such as पुष्पिताग्रा. -सस्य a. half the crops, half grown. -सहः An owl. -सीरिन् m. 1 a cultivator, ploughman who takes half the crop for his labour; शूद्रेषु दासगोपालकुलमित्रार्धसीरिणः Y.1.166. -2 = अर्धिक q. v. -हर, -हारिन् a. occupying the half (of the body); Ku.1.5; एको रागिषु राजते प्रियतमादेहार्ध- हारी हरः Bh.3.121. -हारः a necklace of 64 strings. A half chain, a kind of ornament; नक्षत्रमालामपि चार्धहारं सुवर्णसूत्रं परितः स्तनाभ्याम् Māna.5.297-98. cf. also Kau. A.2.11. -ह्रस्वः half a (short) syllable.
dur दुर् ind. (A prefix substituted for दुस् before words beginning with vowels or soft consonants in the sense of 'bad'. 'hard' or 'difficult to do a certain thing'; for compounds with दुस् as first member see दुस् s. v.). -Comp. -अक्ष a. 1 weak-eyed. -2 evileyed. (-क्षः) 1 a loaded or false die. -2 dishonest gambling. -अक्षरम् an evil word; श्रुतिं ममाविश्य भवद्दुरक्षरं सृजत्यदः कीटकवदुत्कटा रुजः N.9.63. -अतिक्रम a. difficult to be overcome or conquered, unconquerable; सर्वं तु तपसा साध्यं तपो हि दुरति- क्रमम् Ms.11.2.38; स्वभावो दुरतिक्रमः 'nature cannot be changed'; स्वजातिर्दुरतिक्रमा Pt.1. -2 insurmountable, impassable; B. R.6.18-19. -3 inevitable. (-मः) an epithet of Viṣṇu. -अत्यय a. 1 difficult to be overcome; स्वर्गमार्गपरिघो दुरत्ययः R.11.88. -2 hard to be attained or fathomed; स एष आत्मा स्वपरेत्यबुद्धिभिर्दुरत्यया- नुक्रमणो निरूप्यते Bhāg.7.5.13. -अदृष्टम् ill-luck, misfortune. -अधिग, -अधिगम a. 1 hard to reach or attain, unattainable; Bhāg.3.23.8; दुरधिगमः परभागो यावत्पुरुषेण पौरुषं न कृतम् Pt.1.33. -2 insurmountable. -3 hard to be studied or understood; इह दुरधिगमैः किञ्चि- देवागमैः Ki.5.18. -अधिष्ठित a. badly performed, managed, or executed. (-तम्) improper stay at a place. -अधीत a. badly learnt or read. -अध्यय a. 1 difficult of attainment; सहस्रवर्त्मा चपलैर्दुरध्ययः Śi.12.11. -2 hard to be studied. -अध्यवसायः a foolish undertaking. -अध्वः a bad road; स्वयं दुरध्वार्णवनाविकाः कथं स्पृशन्तु विज्ञाय हृदापि तादृशीम् N.9.33. -अन्त a. 1 whose end is difficult to be reached, endless, infinite; संकर्षणाय सूक्ष्माय दुरन्तायान्तकाय च Bhāg. -2 ending ill or in misery, unhappy; अहो दुरन्ता बलवद्विरोधिता Ki.1.23; नृत्यति युवति- जनेन समं सखि विरहिजनस्य दुरन्ते (वसन्ते) Gīt.1; इयमुदरदरी- दुरन्तधारा यदि न भवेदभिमानभङ्गभूमिः Udb. -3 hard to be understood or known. -4 insurmountable. -अन्तक a. = दुरन्त q. v. (-कः) an epithet of Śiva. -अन्वय a. 1 difficult to be passed along; Mb.14.51.17. -2 hard to be carried out or followed. -3 difficult to be attained. or understood; बुद्धिश्च ते महाप्राज्ञ देवैरपि दुरन्वया Rām.3. 66.18. -4 not suitable, improper; वचो दुरन्वयं विप्रास्तूष्णी- मासन्भ्रमद्धियः Bhāg.1.84.14. (-यः) 1 a wrong conclusion, one wrongly inferred from given premisses. -2 (in gram.) a false agreement. -अपवादः ill report. slander. -अभिग्रह a. difficult to be caught. -अभि- मानिन् a. vain-glorious, disagreeably proud. -अवगम a. incomprehensible; Bhāg.5.13.26. -अवग्रह a. 1 difficult to be restrained or subjugated; भक्ता भजस्व दुरवग्रह मा त्यजास्मान् Bhāg.1.29.31. -2 disagreeable. -अवग्राह a. difficult to be attained; Bhāg.7.1.19. -अवच्छद a. difficult to be hidden; हेतुभिर्लक्षयांचक्रुराप्रीतां दुरवच्छदैः Bhāg.1.62.28. -अवबोध a. unintelligible. Bhāg.1.49.29. -अवसित a. unfathomed, difficult to be ascertained, द्युपतिभिरजशक्रशंकराद्यैर्दुरवसितस्तवमच्युतं नतो$स्मि Bhāg.12.12.67. -अवस्थ a. ill off, badly or poorly circumstanced. -अवस्था, -स्थानम् a wretched or miserable state; Bhāg.5.3.12. -अवाप a. difficult to be gained or fulfilled; Ś.1. -अवेक्षितम् an improper look. -अह्नः a bad day. -आकृति a. ugly, mis-shaped. -आक्रन्द a. crying bitterly or miserably; किं क्रन्दसि दुराक्रन्द स्वपक्ष- क्षयकारक Pt.4.29. -आक्रम a. 1 invincible, unconquerable. -2 difficult to be passed. -आक्रमणम् 1 unfair attack. -2 difficult approach. -आगमः improper or illegal acquisition. -आग्रहः foolish obstinacy, headstrongness, pertinacity; ममाहमित्यूढदुराग्रहाणां पुंसाम् Bhāg.3. 5.43. -आचर a. 1 hard to be performed. -2 incurable (as a disease). -आचार a. 1 ill-conducted, badly behaved. -2 following bad practices, wicked, depraved; अपि चेत्सुदुराचारो भजते मामनन्यभाक् Bg.9.3. (-रः) bad practice, ill-conduct, wikedness. -आढ्य a. not rich, poor. -आत्मता vileness, baseness, wickedness. -आत्मन् a. evil-natured, low, wicked, vile, base, mean; ये च प्राहुर्दुरात्मानो दुराराध्या महीभुजः Pt.1.39. (-m.) a rascal, villain, scoundrel. -आधर a. difficult to be withstood or overpowered, irresistible. -आधर्ष a. hard to be approached or assailed, unassailable जगन्नाथो दुराधर्षो गङ्गां भागीरथीं प्रति Mb. -2 not to be attacked with impunity. -3 haughty. (-र्षः) white mustard. -आधारः an epithet of Śiva. -आधिः (m.) 1 distress or anxiety of mind; निरस्तनारीसमया दुराधयः Ki.1.28. -2 indignation. -आधी a. Ved. malignant, thinking ill of. -आनम a. difficult to bend or draw; स विचिन्त्य धनुर्दुरानमम् R.11.38. -आप a. 1 difficult to be obtained; श्रिया दुरापः कथमीप्सितो भवेत् Ś.3.13; R.1.72;6.62. -2 difficult to be approached; Pt.1.67. -3 hard to be overcome. -आपादन a. difficult to be brought about; किं दुरापादनं तेषाम् Bhāg.3.23.42. -आपूर a. difficult to be filled or satisfied; Bhāg.7.6.8. -आबाध a. hard to be molested. (-धः) N. of Śiva. -आमोदः bad scent, stench; शवधूमदुरामोदः शालिभक्ते$त्र विद्यते Ks.82.22. -आराध्य a. difficult to be propitiated, hard to be won over or conciliated; दुराराध्याः श्रियो राज्ञां दुरापा दुष्परिग्रहाः Pt.1.38. -आरुह a. difficult to be mounted. (-हः) 1 the Bilva tree. -2 the cocoanut tree. -3 the date tree. -आरोप a. difficult to be strung (bow); दुरारोपमैन्दुशेखरं धनुर्दुर्निवारा रावणभुजदण्डाः B. R.1.46-47. -आरोह a. difficult of ascent. (-हः) 1 The cocoanut tree. -2 the palm tree. -3 the date tree. -आलापः 1 a curse, imprecation. -2 foul of abusive language. -आलोक a. 1 difficult to be seen or perceived. -2 painfully bright, dazzling; दुरालोकः स समरे निदाघाम्बररत्नवत् K. P.1. (-कः) dazzling splendour. -आव(वा)र a. 1 difficult to be covered or filled up; दुरावरं त्वदन्येन राज्यखण्डमिदं महत् Rām.2.15.5. -2 difficult to be restrained, shut in, kept back or stopped. -आवर्त a. difficult to be convinced or set up; भवन्ति सुदुरावर्ता हेतुमन्तो$पि पण्डिताः Mb.12.19.23. -आशय a. 1 evil-minded, wicked, malicious, स्फुटनिर्भिन्नो दुराशयो$धमः Śi. उपेयिवान् मूलमशेषमूलं दुराशयः कामदुघाङ्घ्रिपस्य Bhāg.3.21.15. -2 having a bad place or rest. (-m.) the subtle body which is not destroyed by death (लिङ्गदेह); एतन्मे जन्म लोके$स्मिन्मुमुक्षूणां दुराशयात् Bhāg.3.24. 36. -आशा 1 a bad or wicked desire. -2 hoping against hope. -आस a. difficult to be abided or associated with; संघर्षिणा सह गुणाभ्यधिकैर्दुरासम् Śi.5.19. -आसद a. 1 difficult to be approached or overtaken; स सभूव दुरासदः परैः R.3.66; 8.4; Mv.2.5; 4.15. -2 difficult to be found or met with. -3 unequalled, unparalleled. -4 hard to be borne, insupportable. -5 difficult to be conquered, unassailable, unconquerable; जहि शत्रुं महाबाहो कामरूपं दुरासदम् Bg.3.43. (-दः) an epithet of Śiva. -इत a. 1 difficult. -2 sinful. (-तम्) 1 a bad course, evil, sin; दरिद्राणां दैन्यं दुरितमथ दुर्वासनहृदां द्रुतं दूरीकुर्वन् G. L.2; R.8.2; Amaru.2; Mv.3.43. -2 a difficulty, danger. -3 a calamity, evil; अपत्ये यत्तादृग्- दुरितमभवत् U.4.3. -इतिः f. Ved. 1 a bad course. -2 difficulty. -इष्टम् 1 a curse, imprecation. -2 a spell or sacrificial rite performed to injure another person. -ईशः a bad lord or master. -ईषणा, -एषणा 1 a curse, an imprecation. -2 an evil eye. -उक्त a. harshly uttered; Pt.1.89. -उक्तम्, -उक्तिः f. offensive speech, reproach, abuse, censure; लक्ष्मि क्षमस्व वचनीयमिदं दुरुक्तम् Udb. -उच्छेद a. difficult to be destroyed. -उत्तर a. 1 unanswerable. -2 difficult to be crossed; दुरुत्तरे पङ्क इवान्धकारे Bk.11.2; प्राप्तः पङ्को दुरुत्तरः Ki.15.17. -उदय a. appearing with difficulty, not easily manifested; यो$ नात्मनां दुरुदयो भगवान्प्रतीतः Bhāg.3.16.5. -उदर्क a. having bad or no consequences; N.5.41. -उदाहर a. difficult to be pronounced or composed; अनुज्झितार्थसंबन्धः प्रबन्धो दुरुदाहरः Śi.2.73. -उद्वह a. burdensome, unbearable. -उपसद a. difficult of approach; Ki.7.9. -उपसर्पिन् a. approaching incautiously; एकमेव दहत्यग्निर्नरं दुरुपसर्पिणम् Ms.7.9. -ऊह a. abstruse; जानीते जयदेव एव शरणः श्लाघ्ये दुरूहद्रुते Gīt. -एव a. Ved. 1 having evil ways. -2 irresistible, unassailable. (-वः) a wicked person. -ओषस् a. Ved. slow, lazy. -ग 1 difficult of access, inaccessible, impervious, impassable; दुर्गस्त्वेष महापन्थाः Mb.12.3. 5; दुर्गं पथस्तत्कवयो वदन्ति Kaṭh.1.3.14. -2 unattainable. -3 incomprehensible. -4 following wicked path, vicious; Rām.2.39.22. (-गः, -गम्) 1 a difficult or narrow passage through a wood or over a stream, mountain &c., a defile, narrow pass. -2 a citadel. fortress, castle; न दुर्गं दुर्गमित्येव दुर्गमं मन्यते जनः । तस्य दुर्गमता सैव यत्प्रभुस्तस्य दुर्गमः ॥ Śiva. B.16.61. -3 rough ground. -4 difficulty, adversity, calamity, distress, danger; निस्तारयतिं दुर्गाच्च Ms.3.98;11.43; मच्चित्तः सर्व- दुर्गाणि मत्प्रसादात्तरिष्यसि; Bg.18.58. (-गः) 1 bdellium. -2 the Supreme Being. -3 N. of an Asura slain by Durgā (thus receiving her name from him). ˚अध्यक्षः, ˚पतिः, ˚पालः the commandant or governor of a castle. ˚अन्तः The suburb of a fort; दुर्गान्ते सिद्धतापसाः Kau. A. 1.12. ˚कर्मन् n. fortification. ˚कारक a. making difficult. (-कः) the birch tree. ˚घ्नी N. of Durgā. ˚तरणी an epithet of Sāvitrī. सावित्री दुर्गतरणी वीणा सप्तविधा तथा Mb. ˚मार्गः a defile, gorge. ˚लङ्घनम् surmounting difficulties. (-नः) a camel. ˚संचरः 1 a difficult passage as to a fort &c., a bridge &c. over a defile. ˚संस्कारः Repairs to the old forts; अतो दुर्गसंस्कार आरब्धव्ये किं कौमुदीमहोत्सवेन Mu. ˚सिंहः N. of the author of कलापपरिशिष्ट. ˚व्यसनम् a defect or weak point in a fortress. (-र्गा) an epithet of Pārvatī, wife of Śiva. -2 the female cuckoo -3 N. of several plants. ˚नवमी the 9th day of the bright half of कार्तिक. ˚पूजा the chief festival in honour of दुर्गा in Bengal in the month of Āśvina. -गत a. 1 unfortunate, in bad circumstances; समाश्वसिमि केनाहं कथं प्राणिमि दुर्गतः Bk.18.1. -2 indigent, poor. -3 distressed, in trouble. -गतता ill-luck, poverty, misery; तावज्जन्मातिदुःखाय ततो दुर्गतता सदा Pt.1.265. -गतिः f. 1 misfortune, poverty, want, trouble, indigence; न हि कल्याणकृत्कश्चिद् दुर्गतिं तात गच्छति Bg.6.4. -2 a difficult situation or path. -3 hell. -गन्ध a. ill-smelling. (-न्धः) 1 bad odour, stink -2 any ill-smelling substance. -3 an onion. -4 the mango tree. (-न्धम्) sochal salt. -गन्धि, -गन्धिन् a. ill-smelling. -गम a. 1 impassable, inaccessible, impervious; कामिनीकायकान्तारे कुचपर्वतदुर्गमे Bh.1.86; Śi. 12.49. -2 unattainable, difficult of attainment. -3 hard to be understood. (-मम्) a difficult place like hill etc; भ्राम्यन्ते दुर्गमेष्वपि Pt.5.81. -गाढ, -गाध, -गाह्य a. difficult to be fathomed or investigated, unfathomable. -गुणितम् not properly studied; चिराम्यस्तपथं याति शास्त्रं दुर्गुणितं यथा Avimārakam.2.4. -गोष्ठी evil association; conspiracy. वृद्धो रक्कः कम्पनेशो दुर्गोष्ठीमध्यगो$भवत् Rāj. T.6. 17. -ग्रह a. 1 difficult to be gained or accomplished. -2 difficult to be conquered or subjugated; दुर्गाणि दुर्ग्रहाण्यासन् तस्य रोद्धुरपि द्विषाम् R.17.52. -3 hard to be understood. (-हः) 1 a cramp, spasm. -2 obstinacy. -3 whim, monomania; कथं न वा दुर्ग्रहदोष एष ते हितेन सम्य- ग्गुरुणापि शम्यते N.9.41. -घट a. 1 difficult. कार्याणि घटयन्नासीद् दुर्घटान्यपि हेलया Rāj. T.4.364. -2 impossible. -घण a. 1 closely packed together, very compact. -घुरुटः An unbeliever; L. D. B. -घोषः 1 a harsh cry. -2 a bear. -जन a. 1 wicked, bad, vile. -2 slanderous, malicious, mischievous; यथा स्त्रीणां तथा वाचां साधुत्वे दुर्जनो जनः U.1.6. (-नः) a bad or wicked person, a malicious or mischievous man, villain; दुर्जनः प्रियवादी च नैतद्विश्वास- कारणम् Chāṇ.24,25; शाम्येत्प्रत्यपकारेण नोपकारेण दुर्जनः Ku.2.4. (दुर्जनायते Den. Ā. to become wicked; स्वजनो$पि दरिद्राणां तत्क्षणाद् दुर्जनायते Pt.1.5.). (दुर्जनीकृ [च्वि] to make blameworthy; दुर्जनीकृतास्मि अनेन मां चित्रगतां दर्शयता Nāg.2). -जय a. invincible. (-यः) N. of Viṣṇu. -जर a. 1 ever youthful; तस्मिन्स्तनं दुर्जरवीर्यमुल्बणं घोराङ्कमादाय शिशोर्दधावथ Bhāg.1.6.1. -2 hard (as food), indigestible. -3 difficult to be enjoyed; राजश्रीर्दुर्जरा तस्य नवत्वे भूभुजो$भवत् Rāj. T.5.19. -जात a. 1 unhappy, wretched. -2 bad-tempered, bad, wicked; Rāj. T.3. 142. -3 false, not genuine. ˚जीयिन् a. one who is born in vain; यो न यातयते वैरमल्पसत्त्वोद्यमः पुमान् । अफलं जन्म तस्याहं मन्ये दुर्जातजायिनः ॥ Mb. (-तम्) 1 a misfortune, calamity, difficulty; त्वं तावद् दुर्जाते मे$त्यन्तसाहाय्यकारिणी भव M.3; दुर्जातबन्धुः R.13.72. 'a friend in need or adversity.' -2 impropriety. -जाति a. 1 bad natured, vile, wicked; रुदितशरणा दुर्जातीनां सहस्व रुषां फलम् Amaru.96. -2 outcast. (-तिः f.) misfortune, ill condition. -ज्ञान, -ज्ञेय a. difficult to be known, incomprehensible. उच्चावचेषु भुतेषु दुर्ज्ञेयामकृतात्मभिः Ms.6.73. (-यः) N. of Śiva. -णयः, -नयः, -नीतिः 1 bad conduct. -2 impropriety -3 injustice. -णामन्, -नामन् a. having a bad name. -णीत a. 1 ill-behaved. -2 impolitic. -3 forward. (-तम्) misconduct; दुर्णीतं किमिहास्ति किं सुचरितं कः स्थानलाभे गुणः H. -दम, -दमन, -दम्य a. difficult to be subdued, untamable, indomitable. -दर्श a. 1 difficult to be seen. -2 dazzling; सुदुर्दर्शमिदं रूपं दृष्टवानसि यन्मन Bg.11.52. -दर्शन a. ugly, ill-looking; दुर्दर्शनेन घटतामियमप्यनेन Māl.2.8. -दशा a misfortune, calamity. -दान्त a. 1 hard to be tamed or subdued, untamable; Śi.12.22. -2 intractable, proud, insolent; दुर्दान्तानां दमनविधयः क्षत्रियेष्वायतन्ते Mv.3.34. (-तः) 1 a calf. -2 a strife, quarrel. -3 N. of Śiva. -दिन a. cloudy, rainy. (-नम्) 1 a bad day in general; तद्दिनं दुर्दिनं मन्ये यत्र मित्रागमो हि न Subhāṣ. -2 a rainy or cloudy day, stormy or rainy weather; उन्नमत्यकालदुर्दिनम् Mk.5; Ku.6 43; Mv.4.57. -3 a shower (of anything); द्विषां विषह्य काकुत्स्थस्तत्र नाराचदुर्दिनम् ॥ सन्मङ्गलस्नात इव R.4.41,82;5.47; U.5.5. -4 thick darkness; जीमूतैश्च दिशः सर्वाश्चक्रे तिमिरदुर्दिनाः Mb. (दुर्दिनायते Den. Ā. to become cloudy.) -दिवसः a dark or rainy day; Pt.1.173. -दुरूटः, -ढः 1 an unbeliever -2 an abusive word. -दृश a. 1 disagreeable to the sight, disgusting; दुर्दृशं तत्र राक्षसं घोररूपमपश्यत्सः Mb.1.2.298. -2 difficult to be seen; पादचारमिवादित्यं निष्पतन्तं सुदुर्दृशम् Rām.7.33.5. -दृष्ट a. illjudged or seen, wrongly decided; Y.2.35. -दैवम् ill-luck, misfortune. -द्यूतम् an unfair game. -द्रुमः onion (green). -धर a. 1 irresistible, difficult to be stopped. -2 difficult to be borne or suffered; दुर्धरेण मदनेन साद्यते Ghat.11; Ms.7.28. -3 difficult to be accomplished. -4 difficult to be kept in memory. (-रः) quicksilver. -धर्ष a. 1 inviolable, unassailable. -2 inaccessible; संयोजयति विद्यैव नीचगापि नरं सरित् । समुद्रमिव दुर्धर्षं नृपं भाग्य- मतः परम् ॥ H. Pr.5. -3 fearful, dreadful. -4 haughty. -धी a. stupid, silly. -नयः 1 arrogance. -2 immorality. -3 evil strategy; उन्मूलयितुमीशो$हं त्रिवर्गमिव दुर्नयः Mu.5.22. -नामकः piles. ˚अरिः a kind of bulbous root (Mar. सुरण). -नामन् m. f. a cockle. (-n.) piles. -निग्रह a. irrepressible, unruly; मनो दुर्निग्रहं चलम् Bg.6.35. -निमित a. carelessly put or placed on the ground; पदे पदे दुर्निमिते गलन्ती R.7.1. -निमित्तम् 1 a bad omen; R.14.5. -2 a bad pretext. -निवार, -निवार्य a. difficult to be checked or warded off, irresistible, invincible. -नीतम् 1 misconduct, bad policy, demerit, misbehaviour; दुर्णीतं किमि- हास्ति Pt.2.21; H.1.49. -2 ill-luck. -नीतिः f. maladministration; दुर्नीतिं तव वीक्ष्य कोपदहनज्वालाजटालो$पि सन्; Bv.4.36. -नृपः a bad king; आसीत् पितृकुलं तस्य भक्ष्यं दुर्नृप- रक्षसः Rāj. T.5.417. -न्यस्त a. badly arranged; दुर्न्यस्त- पुष्परचितो$पि Māl.9.44. -बल a. 1 weak, feeble. -2 enfeebled, spiritless; दुर्बलान्यङ्गकानि U.1.24. -3 thin, lean, emaciated; U.3. -4 small, scanty, little; स्वार्थोप- पत्तिं प्रति दुर्बलाशः R.5.12. -बाध a. Unrestrained (अनिवार); दुर्बाधो जनिदिवसान्मम प्रवृद्धः (आधिः); Mv.6.28. -बाल a. 1 bald-headed. -2 void of prepuce. -3 having crooked hair. -बुद्धि a. 1 silly, foolish, stupid. -2 perverse, evil-minded, wicked; धार्तराष्ट्रस्य दुर्बुद्धेर्युद्धे प्रियचिकीर्षवः (समा- गताः) Bg.1.23 -बुध a. wicked-minded, silly; Mb. 11.4.18. -बोध a. unintelligible, unfathomable, inscrutable; निसर्गदुर्बोधमबोधविक्लवाः क्व भूपतीनां चरितं क्व जन्तवः Ki. 1.6. -भग a. 1 unfortunate, unlucky; श्रीवल्लभं दुर्भगाः (निन्दन्ति) Pt.1.415. -2 not possessed of good features, ill-looking. -भगा 1 a wife disliked by her husband; दुर्भगाभरणप्रायो ज्ञानं भारः क्रियां विना H.1.17. -2 an ill-tempered woman, a shrew. -3 a widow; -भर a. insupportable, burdensome, heavily laden with (comp.); ततो राजाब्रवीदेतं बहुव्यसनदुर्भरः Ks.112.156. -भाग्य a. unfortunate, unlucky. (ग्यम्) ill-luck. -भावना 1 an evil thought. -2 a bad tendency. -भिक्षम् 1 scarcity of provisions, dearth, famine; Y.2.147; Ms.8.22; उत्सवे व्यसने चैव दुर्भिक्षे... यस्तिष्ठति स बान्धवः H.1.71; Pt.2. -2 want in general. -भिद, -भेद, -भेद्य a. firm; सुजनस्तु कनकघटवद् दुर्भेद्यश्चाशु संध्येयः Subhāṣ. -भृत्यः a bad servant. -भिषज्यम् incurability; Bṛi. Up.4.3.14. -भ्रातृ m. a bad brother. -मङ्कु a. obstinate, disobedient. -मति a. 1 silly, stupid, foolish, ignorant. -2 wicked, evilminded; न सांपरायिकं तस्य दुर्मतेर्विद्यते फलम् Ms.11.3. -मद a. drunken, ferocious, maddened, infatuated; Bhāg.1.15.7. -दः foolish pride, arrogance. -दम् the generative organ; ग्रामकं नाम विषयं दुर्मदेन समन्वितः Bhāg.4.25.52. -मनस् a. troubled in mind, discouraged, disspirited, sad, malancholy; अद्य बार्हस्पतः श्रीमान् युक्तः पुष्येण राघवः । प्रोच्यतै ब्राह्मणैः प्राज्ञैः केन त्वमसि दुर्मनाः ॥ Rām. [दुर्मनायते Den. Ā. to be troubled in mind, be sad, meditate sorrowfully, to be disconsolate, become vexed or fretted; Māl.3]. -मनुष्यः a bad or wicked man. -मन्त्रः, -मन्त्रितम्, -मन्त्रणा evil advice, bad counsel; दुर्मन्त्रान्नृपतिर्विनश्यति; Pt.1.169. -मरम् a hard or difficult death; Mb.14.61.9. -मरी a kind of दूर्वा grass. -मरणम् violent or unnatural death. -मर्ष a. 1 unbearable; Bhāg.6.5.42. -2 obstinate, hostile. -मर्षणः N. of Viṣṇu. -मर्षित a. provocated, encouraged; एवं दुर्मर्षितो राजा स मात्रा बभ्रुवाहनः Mb.14. 79.13, -मर्याद a. immodest, wicked. -मल्लिका, -मल्ली a minor drama, comedy, farce; S. D.553. -मित्रः 1 a bad friend. -2 an enemy. -मुख a. 1 having a bad face, hideous, ugly; Bh.1.9. -2 foul-mouthed, abusive, scurrilous; Bh.2.69. (-खः) 1 a horse. -2 N. of Śiva. -3 N. of a serpent king (Nm.) -4 N. of a monkey (Nm.) -5 N. of a year (29th year out of 6 years cycle). -मूल्य a. highly priced, dear. -मेधस् a. silly, foolish, dull-headed, dull; Pt.1. (-m.) a dunce, dull-headed man, blockhead; ग्रन्थानधीत्य व्याकर्तु- मिति दुर्मेधसो$प्यलम् Śi.2.26. -मैत्र a. unfriendly, hostile; Bhāg.7.5.27. -यशस् n. ill-repute, dishonour. -योगः 1 bad or clumsy contrivance. -2 a bad combination. -योध, -योधन a. invincible, unconquerable. (-नः) the eldest of the 11 sons of Dhṛitarāṣṭra and Gāndhārī. [From his early years he conceived a deep hatred for his cousins the Pāṇḍavas, but particularly Bhīma, and made every effort he could to compass their destruction. When his father proposed to make Yudhiṣṭhira heir-apparent, Duryodhana did not like the idea, as his father was the reigning sovereign, and prevailed upon his blind father to send the Pāṇḍavas away into exile. Vāraṇāvata was fixed upon as their abode, and under pretext of constructing a palatial building for their residence, Duryodhana caused a palace to be built mostly of lac, resin and other combustible materials, thereby hoping to see them all destroyed when they should enter it. But the Paṇḍavas were forewarned and they safely escaped. They then lived at Indraprastha, and Yudhiṣṭhira performed the Rājasuya sacrifice with great pomp and splendour. This event further excited the anger and jealousy of Duryodhana, who was already vexed to find that his plot for burning them up had signally failed, and he induced his father to invite the Pāṇḍavas to Hastināpura to play with dice (of which Yudhiṣṭhira was particularly fond). In that gambling-match, Duryodhana, who was ably assisted by his maternal uncle Śakuni, won from Yudhiṣṭhira everything that he staked, till the infatuated gambler staked himself, his brothers, and Draupadī herself, all of whom shared the same fate. Yudhiṣṭhira, as a condition of the wager, was forced to go to the forest with his wife and brothers, and to remain there for twelve years and to pass one additional year incognito. But even this period, long as it was, expired, and after their return from exile both the Pāṇḍavas and Kauravas made great preparations for the inevitable struggle and the great Bhāratī war commenced. It lasted for eighteen days during which all the Kauravas, with most of their allies, were slain. It was on the last day of the war that Bhīma fought a duel with Duryodhana and smashed his thigh with his club.] मोघं तवेदं भुवि नामधेयं दुर्योधनेतीह कृतं पुरस्तात् न हीह दुर्योधनता तवास्ति पलायमानस्य रणं विहाय Mb.4.65.17. -योनि a. of a low birth, न कथंचन दुर्योनिः प्रकृतिं स्वां नियच्छति Ms.1.59. -लक्ष्य a. difficult to be seen or perceived, hardly visible. -क्ष्यम् bad aim; मनः प्रकृत्यैव चलं दुर्लक्ष्यं च तथापि मे Ratn.3.2. -लभ a. 1 difficult to be attained, or accomplished; R.1.67;17.7; Ku.4.4;5.46,61; दुर्लभं भारते जन्म मानुष्यं तत्र दुर्लभम् Subhāṣ. -2 difficult to be found or met with, scarce, rare; शुद्धान्तदुर्लभम् Ś.1.17. -3 best, excellent, eminent. -ग्रामः a village situated close to a large village and inhabited by the free-holders (अग्र- हारोपजीविनः); Māna.1.79-8. -4 dear, beloved. -5 costly. -ललित a. 1 spoilt by fondling, fondled too much, hard to please; हा मदङ्कदुर्ललित Ve.4; V.2.8; Māl.9. -2 (hence) wayward, naughty, illbred, unruly; स्पृहयामि खलु दुर्ललितायास्मै Ś.7. (-तम्) waywardness, rudeness. -लेख्यम् a forged document. Y.2.91. -वच a. 1 difficult to be described, indescribable. अपि वागधिपस्य दुर्वचं वचनं तद् विदधीत विस्मयम् Ki.2.2. -2 not to be talked about. -3 speaking improperly, abusing. (-चम्) abuse, censure, foul language. -वचस् n. abuse, censure; असह्यं दुर्वचो ज्ञातेर्मेघा- न्तरितरौद्रवत् Udb. -वर्ण a. bad-coloured. -र्णः 1 bad colour. -2 impurity; यथा हेम्नि स्थितो वह्निर्दुवर्णं हन्ति धातु- जम् Bhāg.12.3.47. (-र्णम्) 1 silver. दुर्वर्णभित्तिरिह सान्द्रसुधासुवर्णा Śi.4.28. -2 a kind of leprosy. -वस a. difficult to be resided in. -वसतिः f. painful residence; R.8.94. -वह a. heavy, difficult to be borne; दुर्वहगर्भखिन्नसीता U.2.1; Ku.1.11. -वाच् a. speaking ill. (-f.) 1 evil words, abuse. -2 inelegant language or speech. -वाच्य a. 1 difficult to be spoken or uttered. -2 abusive, scurrilous. -3 harsh, cruel (as words). (-च्यम्) 1 censure, abuse. -2 scandal, ill-repute. -वातः a fart. ˚वातय Den. P. to break wind or fart; इत्येके विहसन्त्येनमेके दुर्वातयन्ति च Bhāg.11.23.4. -वादः slander, defamation, calumny. -वार, -वारण a. irresistible, unbearable; R.14.87; किं चायमरिदुर्वारः पाणौ पाशः प्रचेतसः Ku.2.21. -वासना 1 evil propensity, wicked desire; कः शत्रुर्वद खेददानकुशलो दुर्वासनासंचयः Bv. 1.86. -2 a chimera. -वासस् a. 1 ill-dressed. -2 naked. (-m.) N. of a very irascible saint or Ṛiṣi, son of Atri and Anasūyā. (He was very hard to please, and he cursed many a male and female to suffer misery and degradation. His anger, like that of Jamadagni, has become almost proverbial.) -वाहितम् a heavy burden; उरोजपूर्णकुम्भाङ्का सदुर्वाहितविभ्रमा Rāj. T.4.18. -विगाह, -विगाह्य a. difficult to be penetrated or fathomed, unfathomable. -विचिन्त्य inconceivable, inscrutable -विद a. difficult to be known or discovered; नूनं गतिः कृतान्तस्य प्राज्ञैरपि सुदुर्विदा Mb.7.78. 2. -विदग्ध 1 unskilled, raw, foolish, stupid, silly. -2 wholly ignorant. -3 foolishly puffed up, elated. vainly proud; वृथाशस्त्रग्रहणदुर्विदग्ध Ve.3; ज्ञानलवदुर्विदग्धं ब्रह्मापि नरं न रञ्जयति Bh.2.3. -विद्ध a. Badly perforated (a pearl); Kau. A.2.11. -विद्य a. uneducated; Rāj. T.1.354. -विध a. 1 mean, base, low. -2 wicked, vile. -3 poor, indigent; विदधाते रुचिगर्वदुर्विधम् N.2.23. -4 stupid, foolish, silly; विविनक्ति न बुद्धिदुर्विधः Śi.16.39. -विनयः misconduct, imprudence. -विनीत a. 1 (a) badly educated, ill-mannered; ill-behaved, wicked; शासितरि दुर्विनीतानाम् Ś.1.24. (b) rude, naughty, mischievous. -2 stubborn, obstinate. (-तः) 1 a restive or untrained horse. -2 a wayward person, reprobate. -विपाक a. producing bad fruit; श्रितासि चन्दनभ्रान्त्या दुर्विपाकं विषद्रुमम् U.1.46. (-कः) 1 bad result or consequence; U.1.4; किं नो विधिरिह वचने$प्यक्षमो दुर्विपाकः Mv. 6.7. -2 evil consequences of acts done either in this or in a former birth. -विभाव्य a. inconceivable; also दुर्विभाव; असद्वृत्तेरहो वृत्तं दुर्विभावं विधेरिव Ki.11.56. -विमर्श a. difficult to be tried or examined; यो दुर्विमर्शपथया निजमाययेदं सृष्ट्वा गुणान्विभजते तदनुप्रविष्टः Bhāg.1.49.29. -विलसितम् a wayward act, rudeness, naughtiness; डिम्भस्य दुर्विलसितानि मुदे गुरूणाम् B. R.4.6. -विलासः a bad or evil turn of fate; U.1. -विवाहः a censurable marriage; इतरेषु तु शिष्टेषु नृशंसानृतवादिनः । जायन्ते दुर्विवाहेषु ब्रह्मधर्मद्विषः सुताः ॥ Ms.3.41. -विष a. ill-natured, malignant. (-षः) N. of Śiva. -विषह a. unbearable, intolerable, irresistible. (-हः) N. of Śiva. -वृत्त a. 1 vile, wicked, ill-behaved. -2 roguish. (-त्तम्) misconduct, ill-behaviour. दुर्वृत्तवृत्तशमनं तव देवि शीलम् Devīmāhātmya. -वृत्तिः f. 1 misconduct. -2 misery, want, distress. -3 fraud. -वृष्टिः f. insufficient rain, drought. -वेद a. difficult to be known or ascertained. -व्यवहारः a wrong judgment in law. -व्यवहृतिः f. ill-report or rumour. -व्यसनम् 1 a fond pursuit or resolve; Mu.3. -2 bad propensity, vice; तेन दुर्व्यसनेनासीद्भोजने$पि कदर्थना Ks.73.73. -व्रत a. not conforming to rules, disobedient. -हुतम् a badly offered sacrifice. -हृद् a. wicked-hearted, ill-disposed, inimical; अकुर्वतोर्वां शुश्रूषां क्लिष्टयोर्दुर्हृदा भृशम् Bhāg.1.45.9. (-m.) an enemy. -हृदय a. evil-minded, evil-intentioned, wicked. -हृषीक a. having defective organs of sense.
dhavala धवल a. [धवं कम्पं लाति ला-क; Tv.] 1 White; धवलातपत्र, धवलगृहम्, धवलवस्त्रम् &c. नीता येन निशा शशाङ्कधवला Ujjvalamaṇi. -2 Handsome. -3 Clear, pure. -लः 1 The white colour. -2 An excellent bull. -3 China camphor (चीनकर्पूर). -4 N. of a tree. (धव). -लम् White-pepper. -ला A woman with a white complexion. -ली A white cow; (धवला also). -Comp. -उत्पलम् the white water-lily (said to open at moonrise). -गिरिः N. of the highest peak of the Himālaya mountain. -गृहम् a house whitened with chunam, a place. -पक्षः 1 a goose; धवलपक्षविहंगमकूजितैः Śi.6.45. -2 the bright half of a lunar month. -मृत्तिका chalk.
brāhmaṇa ब्राह्मण a. (-णी f.) [ब्रह्म वेदं शुद्धं चैतन्यं वा वेत्त्वधीते वा अण्] 1 Belonging to a Brāhmaṇa. -2 Befitting a Brāhmaṇa. -3 Given by a Brāhmaṇa. -4 Relating to religious worship. -5 One who knows Brahma. -णः 1 A man belonging to the first of the four original castes of the Hindus, a Brāhmaṇa (born from the mouth of the puruṣa); ब्राह्मणो$स्य मुखमासीत् Rv.1.9. 12; Ms.1.31,96; (जन्मना ब्राह्मणो ज्ञेयः संस्कारैर्द्विज उच्यते । विद्यया याति विप्रत्वं त्रिभिः श्रोत्रिय उच्यते ॥ or जात्या कुलेन वृत्तेन स्वाध्यायेन श्रुतेन च । एभिर्युक्तो हि यस्तिष्ठेन्नित्यं स द्विज उच्यते ॥). -2 A priest, theologian. -3 An epithet of Agni. -4 N. of the twentyeighth Nakṣatra. -णम् 1 An assemblage or society of Brāhmaṇas. -2 That portion of the Veda which states rules for the employment of the hymns at the various sacrifices, their origin and detailed explanation, with sometimes lengthy illustrations in the shape of legends or stories. It is distinct from the Mantra portion of the Veda. -3 N. of that class of the Vedic works which contain the Brāhmaṇa portion (regarded as Śruti or part of the revelation like the hymns themselves). Each of the four Vedas has its own Brāhmaṇa or Brāhmaṇas :-ऐतरेय or आश्व- लायन and कौषीतकी or सांख्यायन belonging to the Ṛigveda; शतपथ to the Yajurveda, पञ्चविंश and षड्विंश and six more to the Sāmaveda, and गोपथ to the Atharvaveda. -4 The Soma vessel of the Brahman priest. -Comp. -अतिक्रमः offensive or disrespectful conduct towards Brāhmaṇas, insult to Brāhmaṇas; ब्राह्मणातिक्रमत्यागो भवता- मेव भूतये Mv.2.1. -अगर्शनम् absence of Brahmanical instruction or guidance; वृषलत्वं गता लोके ब्राह्मणादर्शनेन च Ms.1.43. -अपाश्रयः seeking shelter with Brāhmaṇas. -अभ्युपपत्तिः f. protection or preservation of, or kindness shown to, a Brāhmaṇa; ब्राह्मणाभ्युपपत्तौ च शपथे नास्ति पातकम् Ms.8.112. -आत्मक a. belonging to Brāhmaṇas. -घ्नः the slayer of a Brāhmaṇa; स्त्रीबाल- ब्राह्मणघ्नांश्च हन्याद् द्विट्सेविनस्तथा Ms.9.232. -चाण्डालः 1 a degraded or outcast Brāhmaṇa; यथा ब्राह्मणचाण्डालः पूर्व- दृष्टस्तथैव सः Ms.9.87. -2 the son of a Śūdra father by a Brāhmaṇa woman. -जातम्, -जातिः f. the Brāhmaṇa caste. -जीविका the occupation or means of livelihood prescribed for a Brāhmaṇa; अध्यापनमध्ययनं यजनं याजनं तथा । दानं प्रतिग्रहश्चैव षट्कर्माण्यग्रजन्मनः ॥ षण्णां तु कर्मणामस्य त्रीणि कर्माणि जीविका । याजनाध्यापने चैव विशुद्धाच्च प्रतिग्रहः ॥. -द्रव्यम्, -स्वम् a Brāhmaṇa's property. -निन्दकः a blasphemer or reviler of Brāhmaṇas. -प्रसंगः the applicability of the term Brāhmaṇa. -प्रातिवेश्यः a neighbouring Brāhmaṇa; ब्राह्मणप्रातिवेश्यानामेतदेवानिमन्त्रणे Y.2.263. -प्रियः N. of Viṣṇu. -ब्रुवः one who pretends to be a Brāhmaṇa, one who is a Brāhmaṇa only in name and neglects the duties of his caste; बहवो ब्राह्मणब्रुवा निवसन्ति Dk.; सममब्राह्मणे दानं द्विगुणं ब्राह्मणब्रुवे Ms.7.85;8.2. -भावः the rank or condition of a Brāhmaṇa. -भूयिष्ठ a. consisting for the most part of Brāhmaṇas. -यष्टिका, -यष्टी Clerodendrum Siphonantus (Mar. भारंग). -वधः the murder of a Brāhmaṇa, Brahmanicide. -वाचनम् the recitation of benedictions. -संतर्पणम् feeding or satisfying Brāhmaṇas.
brāhmaṇī ब्राह्मणी 1 A woman of the Brāhmaṇa caste. -2 The wife of a Brāhmaṇa. -3 Intellect; (बुद्धि according to नीलकण्ठ). -4 A kind of lizard; हृष्टः पश्यति तस्यान्तं ब्राह्मणी करकादिव Rām.3.29.5. -5 A kind of wasp. -6 A kind of brass (Mar. सोनपितळ). -Comp. -गामिन् m. the paramour of a Brāhmaṇa woman.
rākṣasa राक्षस a. (-सी f.) [रक्षस इदम् अण्] Belonging to or like an evil spirit, demoniacal, partaking of a demon's nature; मुनयो राक्षसीमाहुर्वाचमुन्मत्तदृप्तयोः U.5.3; ततस्तद्राक्षसं सैन्यम् Rām.3.22.17; राक्षसीमासुरीं चैव प्रकृतिं मोहिनीं श्रिताः Bg.9.12. -सः 1 A demon, an evil spirit, a goblin, fiend, imp. -2 One of the eight forms of marriage in Hindu Law, in which a girl is forcibly seized and carried away after the defeat or destruction of her relatives in battle; हत्वा छित्त्वा च भित्त्वा च क्रोशन्तीं रुदतीं गृहात् । प्रसह्य कन्याहरणं राक्षसो विधिरुच्यते ॥ Ms.3.33; राक्षसो युद्धहरणात् Y.1.61. (Kṛiṣṇa carried away Rukmiṇī in this manner.) -3 One of the astronomical Yogas. -4 N. of a minister of Nanda, an important character in the Mudrārākṣasa. -5 A king of the Rākṣasas. -6 N. of the 3th Muhūrta. -7 N. of a संवत्सर. -सी 1 A female demon. -2 Laṅkā or Ceylon. -3 Night. -4 A larger tooth, tusk. -Comp. -इन्द्रः N. of Rāvaṇa. -ग्रहः N. of a particular insanity or seizure. -घ्नः N. of Rāma.
rāvaṇa रावण a. [रु-णिच् ल्यु] Crying, screaming, roaring, bewailing; इत्युक्त्वा परुषं वाक्यं रावणः शत्रुरावणः Rām.3.56. 26 (com. शत्रून् रावयति क्रोशयति शत्ररावणः). -णः N. of a celebrated demon, king of Laṅkā and the chief of the Rākṣhasas; स रावणो नाम निकामभीषणं बभूव रक्षः क्षतरक्षणं दिवः Śi.1.48. [He was the son of Viśravas by Keśinī or Kaikaśī and so half-brother of Kuber. He is called Paulastya as being a grandson of the sage Pulastya. Laṅkā was originally occupied by Kubera, but Rāvaṇa ousted him from it and made it his own capital. He had ten heads (and hence his names Daśagrīva, Daśa- vadana &c.) and twenty arms, and according to some, four legs (cf. R.12.88 and Malli.). He is represented to have practised the most austere penance for ten thousand years in order to propitiate the god Brahman, and to have offered one head at the end of each one thousand years. Thus he offered nine of his heads and was going to offer the tenth when the God was pleased and granted him immunity from death by either god or man. On the strength of this boon he grew very tyrannical and oppressed all beings. His power became so great that even the gods are said to have acted as his domestic servants. He conquered almost all the kings of the day, but is said to have been imprisoned by Kārtavīrya for some time when he went to attack his territory. On one occasion he tried to uplift the Kailāsa mountain, but Śiva pressed it down so as to crush his fingers under it. He, therefore, hymned Śiva for one thousand years so loudly that the God gave him the name Rāvaṇa and freed him from his painful position. But though he was so powerful and invincible, the day of retribution drew near. While Rāma who was Viṣṇu descended on earth for the destruction of this very demon was passing his years of exile in the forest, Rāvaṇa carried off his wife Sītā and urged her to become his wife but she persistently refused and remained loyal to her husband. At last Rāma assisted by his monkey-troops invaded Laṅkā, annihilated Rāvaṇa's troops and killed the demon himself. He was a worthy opponent of Rāma, and hence the expression:-- रामरावणयोर्युद्धं रामरावणयोरिव ।]. -णम् 1 The act of screaming. -2 N. of a Muhūrta. -Comp. -अरिः N. of Rāma. -गङ्गा N. of a river in Laṅkā.
vaḍavā वडवा 1 A mare; सैव भूत्वाथ वडवा नासत्यौ सुषुवे भुवि Bhāg. 6.6.4. -2 The nymph Aśvinī who in the form of a mare bore to the sun two sons, the Aśvins; see संज्ञा. -3 A female slave. -4 A harlot, prostitute. -5 A woman of the Brāhmaṇa caste (द्विजयोषित्). -6 A particular constellation represented by a horse's head. -Comp. अग्निः, -अनलः the submarine fire. -भर्तृ N. of the mythical horse उच्चैःश्रवस्. -मुखः 1 the submarine fire; मोक्षदुर्लाभ- विषयं वडवामुखसागरम् Mb.12.31.71. -2 N. of Śiva.
sūta सूत p. p. [सू-क्त] 1 Born, begotten, engendered, produced. -2 Impelled, emitted. -तः 1 A charioteer; सूत, चोदयाश्वान् पुण्याश्रमदर्शनेन तावदात्मानं पुनीमहे Ś.1; पुनः पुनः सूतनिषिद्धचापलं हरन्तमश्वं रथरश्मिसंयतम् R.3.42. -2 The son of a Kṣatriya by a woman of the Brāhmaṇa caste (his business being that of a charioteer); क्षत्रियाद् विप्र- कन्यायां सूतो भवति जातितः Ms.1.11; सूतो वा सूतपुत्रो वा यो वा को वा भवाम्यहम् Ve.3.33. -3 The son of a Vaiśya by a Kṣatriya wife (his business being that of a bard). -4 A bard; पुरःसरैः स्वस्तिकसूतमागधैः Rām.2.17.46; Bhāg.1.11.2. -5 A carpenter. -6 The sun. -7 N. of a pupil of Vyāsa. -8 N. of Sañjaya (a pupil of Vyāsa); समरवृत्तविबोधसमीहया कुरुवरेण मुदा कृतयाचनः। सपदि सूतमदादमलेक्षणं मुनिवरं तमहं सततं भजे ॥ Vedavyāsāṣṭakam 7. -तः, -तम् Quick-silver. -Comp. -जः, -तनयः, -पुत्रः 1 an epithet of Sañjaya; तमेवंवादिनं राजा सूतपुत्रं कृताञ्जलिम् (अब्रवीत्) Mb.8.2.9. -2 an epithet of Karṇa; कथयामास तत् सर्वं यथा शप्तः स सूतजः Mb.12.2.1. -राज् m. quick-silver.
     Vedic Index of
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aurva ‘Descendant of Uru or Urva,’ appears in the Rigveda in close connexion with Bhrgu, being probably a Bhrgu himself. As in one passage of the Aitareya Brāhmana, the descendants of Aitaśa are called the worst of the Aurvas, while the parallel version of the Kausītaki Brāhmana calls them the worst of the Bhrgus, the Aurvas must have been a branch of the larger family of the Bhrgus. Aurva himself is said in the Taittirīya Samhitā to have received offspring from Atri. In the Pañcavimśa Brāhmana two Aurvas are referred to as authorities. See also Kutsa.
giri Mountain ’ or * height,’ is a word that occurs repeatedly in the Rigveda. Thus reference is made to the trees on the hills, hence called ‘tree-haired’ (vrksa-keśāh), and to the streams proceeding from the hills to the sea (samudra,)? The term is frequently coupled with the adjectival parvata. The Rigveda mentions the waters from the hills, and the Athar­vaveda6 refers to the snowy mountains. Actual names of mountains, as Mūjavant, Trikakud, Himavant, are very rare. References to Krauñca, Mahāmeru, and Maināg-a, are confined to the Taittirīya Aranyaka, while Nāvaprabhramśana can no longer be considered a proper name.
trasadasyu Son of Purukutsa, is mentioned in the Rigveda as king of the Pūrus. He was born to Purukutsa by his wife, Purukutsānī, at a time of great distress; this, according to Sāyana, refers to Purukutsa’s captivity: possibly his death is really meant. Trasadasyu was also a descendant of Giriksit and Purukutsa was a descendant of Durgaha. The genealogy, therefore, appears to be: Durgaha, Giriksit, Purukutsa, Trasa­dasyu. Trasadasyu was the ancestor of Tpksi, and, according to Ludwig, had a son Hiranin. Trasadasyu’s chronological position is determined by the fact that his father, Purukutsa, was a contemporary of Sudās, either as an opponent or as a friend. That Purukutsa was an enemy of Sudās is more probable, because the latter’s predecessor, Divodāsa, was apparently at enmity with the Pūrus, and in the battle of the ten kings Pūrus were ranged against Sudās and the Trtsus. Trasadasyu himself seems to have been an energetic king. His people, the Pūrus, were settled on the Sarasvatī, which was, no doubt, the stream in the middle country, that locality according well with the later union of the Pūrus with the Kuru people, who inhabited that country. This union is exemplified in the person of Kuruśravana, who is called Trāsadasyava, ‘ descendant of Trasadasyu,’ in the Rigveda, whose father was Mitrātithi, and whose son was Upamaśravas. The relation of Mitrātithi to Trksi does not appear. Another descendant of Trasadasyu was Tryaruna Traivrsna, who is simply called Trasadasyu in a hymn of the Rigveda. He was not only a 4 descendant of Trivrsan,’ but, according to the Pañcavimśa Brāhmana, he was also Traidhātva, descendant of Tridhātu.’ The order of these two predecessors of Tryaruna cannot be determined in any way from Vedic literature. According to the later tradition, a prince named Tridhanvan preceded Tryaruna in the succession. Vedic tradition further fails to show in what precise relation Trasadasyu stood to Trivrsan or Tryaruna.
varṇa (lit. ‘colour’) In the Rigveda is applied to denote classes of men, the Dāsa and the Aryan Varṇa being contrasted, as other passages show, on account of colour. But this use is confined to distinguishing two colours: in this respect the Rigveda differs fundamentally from the later Samhitās and Brāhmaṇas, where the four castes (varnūh) are already fully recognized. (a) Caste in the Rigveda.—The use of the term Varṇa is not, of course, conclusive for the question whether caste existed in the Rigveda. In one sense it must be admitted to have existed: the Puruṣa-sūkta, ‘hymn of man,’ in the tenth Maṇdala clearly contemplates the division of mankind into four classes—the Brāhmaṇa, Rājanya, Vaiśya, and śūdra. But the hymn being admittedly late,6 its evidence is not cogent for the bulk of the Rigveda.' Zimmer has with great force com- batted the view that the Rigveda was produced in a society that knew the caste system. He points out that the Brāhmaṇas show us the Vedic Indians on the Indus as unbrah- minized, and not under the caste system; he argues that the Rigveda was the product of tribes living in the Indus region and the Panjab; later on a part of this people, who had wandered farther east, developed the peculiar civilization of the caste system. He adopts the arguments of Muir, derived from the study of the data of the Rigveda, viz.: that (a) the four castes appear only in the late Purusasūkta; (6) the term Varṇa, as shown above, covers the three highest castes of later times, and is only contrasted with Dāsa; (c) that Brāhmaṇa is rare in the Rigveda, Kṣatriya occurs seldom, Rājanya only in the Purusasūkta, where too, alone, Vaiśya and śūdra are found; (d) that Brahman denotes at first ‘poet,’ ‘sage,’ and then ‘ officiating priest,’ or still later a special class of priest; (e) that in some only of the passages where it occurs does Brahman denote a ‘priest by profession,’ while in others it denotes something peculiar to the individual, designating a person distinguished for genius or virtue, or specially chosen to receive divine inspiration. Brāhmaṇa, on the other hand, as Muir admits, already denotes a hereditary professional priesthood. Zimmer connects the change from the casteless system of the Rigveda to the elaborate system of the Yajurveda with the advance of the Vedic Indians to the east, comparing the Ger¬manic invasions that transformed the German tribes into monarchies closely allied with the church. The needs of a conquering people evoke the monarch; the lesser princes sink to the position of nobles ; for repelling the attacks of aborigines or of other Aryan tribes, and for quelling the revolts of the subdued population, the state requires a standing army in the shape of the armed retainers of the king, and beside the nobility of the lesser princes arises that of the king’s chief retainers, as the Thegns supplemented the Gesiths of the Anglo-Saxon monarchies. At the same time the people ceased to take part in military matters, and under climatic influences left the conduct of war to the nobility and their retainers, devoting themselves to agriculture, pastoral pursuits, and trade. But the advantage won by the nobles over the people was shared by them with the priesthood, the origin of whose power lies in the Purohitaship, as Roth first saw. Originally the prince could sacrifice for himself and the people, but the Rigveda itself shows cases, like those of Viśvāmitra and Vasiçtha illustrating forcibly the power of the Purohita, though at the same time the right of the noble to act as Purohita is seen in the case of Devāpi Arṣtisena.le The Brahmins saw their opportunity, through the Purohitaship, of gaining practical power during the confusion and difficulties of the wars of invasion, and secured it, though only after many struggles, the traces of which are seen in the Epic tradition. The Atharvaveda also preserves relics of these conflicts in its narration of the ruin of the Spñjayas because of oppressing Brahmins, and besides other hymns of the Atharvaveda, the śatarudriya litany of the Yajurveda reflects the period of storm and stress when the aboriginal population was still seething with discontent, and Rudra was worshipped as the patron god of all sorts of evil doers. This version of the development of caste has received a good deal of acceptance in it's main outlines, and it may almost be regarded as the recognized version. It has, however, always been opposed by some scholars, such as Haug, Kern, Ludwig, and more recently by Oldenberg25 and by Geldner.25 The matter may be to some extent simplified by recognizing at once that the caste system is one that has progressively developed, and that it is not legitimate to see in the Rigveda the full caste system even of the Yajurveda; but at the same time it is difficult to doubt that the system was already well on its way to general acceptance. The argument from the non- brahminical character of the Vrātyas of the Indus and Panjab loses its force when it is remembered that there is much evidence in favour of placing the composition of the bulk of the Rigveda, especially the books in which Sudās appears with Vasiṣṭha and Viśvāmitra, in the east, the later Madhyadeśa, a view supported by Pischel, Geldner, Hopkins,30 and Mac¬donell.81 Nor is it possible to maintain that Brahman in the Rigveda merely means a ‘poet or sage.’ It is admitted by Muir that in some passages it must mean a hereditary profession ; in fact, there is not a single passage in which it occurs where the sense of priest is not allowable, since the priest was of course the singer. Moreover, there are traces in the Rigveda of the threefold or fourfold division of the people into brahma, ksafram, and vitofi, or into the three classes and the servile population. Nor even in respect to the later period, any more than to the Rigveda, is the view correct that regards the Vaiśyas as not taking part in war. The Rigveda evidently knows of no restriction of war to a nobility and its retainers, but the late Atharvaveda equally classes the folk with the bala, power,’ representing the Viś as associated with the Sabhā, Samiti, and Senā, the assemblies of the people and the armed host. Zimmer explains these references as due to tradition only; but this is hardly a legitimate argument, resting, as it does, on the false assumption that only a Kṣatriya can fight. But it is (see Kçatriya) very doubtful whether Kṣatriya means anything more than a member of the nobility, though later, in the Epic, it included the retainers of the nobility, who increased in numbers with the growth of military monarchies, and though later the ordinary people did not necessarily take part in wars, an abstention that is, however, much exaggerated if it is treated as an absolute one. The Kṣatriyas were no doubt a hereditary body; monarchy was already hereditary (see Rājan), and it is admitted that the śūdras were a separate body: thus all the elements of the caste system were already in existence. The Purohita, indeed, was a person of great importance, but it is clear, as Oldenberg37 urges, that he was not the creator of the power of the priesthood, but owed his position, and the influence he could in consequence exert, to the fact that the sacrifice required for its proper performance the aid of a hereditary priest in whose possession was the traditional sacred knowledge. Nor can any argument for the non-existence of the caste system be derived from cases like that of Devāpi. For, in the first place, the Upaniṣads show kings in the exercise of the priestly functions of learning and teaching, and the Upaniṣads are certainly contemporaneous with an elaborated caste system. In the second place the Rigvedic evidence is very weak, for Devāpi, who certainly acts as Purohita, is not stated in the Rigveda to be a prince at all, though Yāska calls him a Kauravya; the hymns attributed to kings and others cannot be vindicated for them by certain evidence, though here, again, the Brāhmaṇas do not scruple to recognize Rājanyarṣis, or royal sages’; and the famous Viśvāmitra shows in the Rigveda no sign of the royal character which the Brāhmaṇas insist on fastening on him in the shape of royal descent in the line of Jahnu. (6) Caste in the later Samhitās and Brāhmanas. The relation between the later and the earlier periods of the Vedic history of caste must probably be regarded in the main as the hardening of a system already formed by the time of the Rigveda. etc. Three castes Brāhmaṇa, Rājan, śūdraare mentioned in the Atharvaveda, and two castes are repeatedly mentioned together, either Brahman and Kṣatra, or Kṣatra and Viś. 2.The Relation of the Castes. The ritual literature is full of minute differences respecting the castes. Thus, for example, the śatapatha prescribes different sizes of funeral mounds for the four castes. Different modes of address are laid down for the four castes, as ehi, approach ’; āgaccha, ‘come’; ādrava, run up ’; ādhāva, hasten up,’ which differ in degrees of politeness. The representatives of the four castes are dedicated at the Puruṣamedha (‘human sacrifice’) to different deities. The Sūtras have many similar rules. But the three upper castes in some respects differ markedly from the fourth, the śūdras. The latter are in the śatapatha Brāhmaṇa declared not fit to be addressed by a Dīkṣita, consecrated person,’ and no śūdra is to milk the cow whose milk is to be used for the Agnihotra ('fire-oblation’). On the other hand, in certain passages, the śūdra is given a place in the Soma sacrifice, and in the Taittirīya Brāhmaṇa there are given formulas for the placing of the sacrificial fire not only for the three upper castes, but also for the Rathakāra, chariot-maker.’ Again, in the Aitareya Brāhmaṇa, the Brāhmaṇa is opposed as eater of the oblation to the members of the other three castes. The characteristics of the several castes are given under Brāhmaṇa, Kçatriya and Rājan, Vaiśya, śūdra: they may be briefly summed up as follows : The Viś forms the basis of the state on which the Brahman and Kṣatra rest;®3 the Brahman and Kṣatra are superior to the Viś j®4 while all three classes are superior to the śūdras. The real power of the state rested with the king and his nobles, with their retainers, who may be deemed the Kṣatriya element. Engaged in the business of the protection of the country, its administration, the decision of legal cases, and in war, the nobles subsisted, no doubt, on the revenues in kind levied from the people, the king granting to them villages (see Grāma) for their maintenance, while some of them, no doubt, had lands of their own cultivated for them by slaves or by tenants. The states were seemingly small there are no clear signs of any really large kingdoms, despite the mention of Mahārājas. The people, engaged in agriculture, pastoral pursuits, and trade (Vaṇij), paid tribute to the king and nobles for the protection afforded them. That, as Baden- Powell suggests, they were not themselves agriculturists is probably erroneous; some might be landowners on a large scale, and draw their revenues from śūdra tenants, or even Aryan tenants, but that the people as a whole were in this position is extremely unlikely. In war the people shared the conflicts of the nobles, for there was not yet any absolute separation of the functions of the several classes. The priests may be divided into two classes the Purohitas of the kings, who guided their employers by their counsel, and were in a position to acquire great influence in the state, as it is evident they actually did, and the ordinary priests who led quiet lives, except when they were engaged on some great festival of a king or a wealthy noble. The relations and functions of the castes are well summed up in a passage of the Aitareya Brāhmaṇa, which treats of them as opposed to the Kṣatriya. The Brāhmaṇa is a receiver of gifts (ā-dāyī), a drinker of Soma (ā-pāyī), a seeker of food (āvasāyī), and liable to removal at will (yathākāma-prayāpyaīi).n The Vaiśya is tributary to another (anyasya balikrt), to be lived on by another (anyasyādyal}), and to be oppressed at will (yathā- kāma-jyeyal}). The śūdra is the servant of another (anyasya j>resyah), to be expelled at will (kāmotthāpyah), and to be slain at pleasure {yathākāma-vadhyah). The descriptions seem calculated to show the relation of each of the castes to the Rājanya. Even the Brāhmaṇa he can control, whilst the Vaiśya is his inferior and tributary, whom he can remove without cause from his land, but who is still free, and whom he cannot maim or slay without due process. The śūdra has no rights of property or life against the noble, especially the king. The passage is a late one, and the high place of the Kṣatriya is to some extent accounted for by this fact. It is clear that in the course of time the Vaiśya fell more and more in position with the hardening of the divisions of caste. Weber shows reason for believing that the Vājapeya sacrifice, a festival of which a chariot race forms an integral part, was, as the śāñkhāyana śrauta Sūtra says, once a sacrifice for a Vaiśya, as well as for a priest or king. But the king, too, had to suffer diminution of his influence at the hands of the priest: the Taittirīya texts show that the Vājapeya was originally a lesser sacrifice which, in the case of a king, was followed by the Rājasūya, or consecration of him as an overlord of lesser kings, and in that of the Brahmin by the Bṛhaspatisava, a festival celebrated on his appointment as a royal Purohita. But the śatapatha Brāhmaṇa exalts the Vājapeya, in which a priest could be the sacrificer, over the Rājasūya, from which he was excluded, and identifies it with the Bṛhaspatisava, a clear piece of juggling in the interests of the priestly pretentions. But we must not overestimate the value of such passages, or the exaltation of the Purohita in the later books of the śatapatha and Aitareya Brāhmanas as evidence of a real growth in the priestly power: these books represent the views of the priests of what their own powers should be, and to some extent were in the Madhyadeśa. Another side of the picture is presented in the Pāli literature, which, belonging to a later period than the Vedic, undoubtedly underestimates the position of the priests ; while the Epic, more nearly contemporaneous with the later Vedic period, displays, despite all priestly redaction, the temporal superiority of the nobility in clear light. Although clear distinctions were made between the different castes, there is little trace in Vedic literature of one of the leading characteristics of the later system, the impurity communicated by the touch or contact of the inferior castes, which is seen both directly in the purification rendered necessary in case of contact with a śūdra, and indirectly in the prohibition of eating in company with men of lower caste. It is true that prohibition of eating in company with others does appear, but hot in connexion with caste: its purpose is to preserve the peculiar sanctity of those who perform a certain rite or believe in a certain doctrine; for persons who eat of the same food together, according to primitive thought, acquire the same characteristics and enter into a sacramental communion. But Vedic literature does not yet show that to take food from an inferior caste was forbidden as destroying purity. Nor, of course, has the caste system developed the constitution with a head, a council, and common festivals which the modern caste has; for such an organization is not found even in the Epic or in the Pāli literature. The Vedic characteristics of caste are heredity, pursuit of a common occupation, and restriction on intermarriage. 3. Restrictions on Intermarriage. Arrian, in his Indica, probably on the authority of Megasthenes, makes the prohibi¬tion of marriage between <γevη, no doubt castes,’ a characteristic of Indian life. The evidence of Pāli literature is in favour of this view, though it shows that a king could marry whom he wished, and could make his son by that wife the heir apparent. But it equally shows that there were others who held that not the father’s but the mother’s rank determined the social standing of the son. Though Manu recognizes the possibility of marriage with the next lower caste as producing legitimate children, still he condemns the marriage of an Aryan with a woman of lower caste. The Pāraskara Gṛhya Sūtra allows the marriage of a Kṣatriya with a wife of his own caste or of the lower caste, of a Brahmin with a wife of his own caste or of the two lower classes, and of a Vaiśya with a Vaiśya wife only. But it quotes the opinion of others that all of them can marry a śūdra wife, while other authorities condemn the marriage with a śūdra wife in certain circumstances, which implies that in other cases it might be justified. The earlier literature bears out this impression: much stress is laid on descent from a Rṣi, and on purity of descent ; but there is other evidence for the view that even a Brāhmaṇa need not be of pure lineage. Kavaṣa Ailūṣa is taunted with being the son of a Dāsī, ‘slave woman,’ and Vatsa was accused of being a śūdrā’s son, but established his purity by walking unhurt through the flames of a fire ordeal. He who is learned (śiiśruvān) is said to be a Brāhmaṇa, descended from a Rṣi (1ārseya), in the Taittirīya Samhitā; and Satyakāma, son of Jabālā, was accepted as a pupil by Hāridrumata Gautama, though he could not name his father. The Kāthaka Samhitā says that knowledge is all-important, not descent. But all this merely goes to show that there was a measure of laxity in the hereditary character of caste, not that it was not based on heredity. The Yajurveda Samhitās recognize the illicit union of Árya and śūdrā, and vice versa: it is not unlikely that if illicit unions took place, legal marriage was quite possible. The Pañcavimśa Brāhmaṇa, indeed, recognizes such a case in that of Dīrghatamas, son of the slave girl Uśij, if we may adopt the description of Uśij given in the Brhaddevatā. In a hymn of the Atharvaveda extreme claims are put forward for the Brāhmaṇa, who alone is a true husband and the real husband, even if the woman has had others, a Rājanya or a Vaiśya: a śūdra Husband is not mentioned, probably on purpose. The marriage of Brāhmaṇas with Rājanya women is illustrated by the cases of Sukanyā, daughter of king śaryāta, who married Cyavana, and of Rathaviti’s daughter, who married śyāvāśva. 4.Occupation and Caste.—The Greek authorities and the evidence of the Jātakas concur in showing it to have been the general rule that each caste was confined to its own occupations, but that the Brāhmaṇas did engage in many professions beside that of simple priest, while all castes gave members to the śramaṇas, or homeless ascetics. The Jātakas recognize the Brahmins as engaged in all sorts of occupations, as merchants, traders, agriculturists, and so forth. Matters are somewhat simpler in Vedic literature, where the Brāhmaṇas and Kṣatriyas appear as practically confined to their own professions of sacrifice and military or administrative functions. Ludwig sees in Dīrgliaśravas in the Rigveda a Brahmin reduced by indigence to acting as a merchant, as allowed even later by the Sūtra literature; but this is not certain, though it is perfectly possible. More interesting is the question how far the Ksatriyas practised the duties of priests; the evidence here is conflicting. The best known case is, of course, that of Viśvāmitra. In the Rigveda he appears merely as a priest who is attached to the court of Sudās, king of the Tftsus ; but in the Pañcavimśa Brāhmaṇa he is called a king, a descendant of Jahnu, and the Aitareya Brāhmaṇa refers to śunahśepa’s succeeding, through his adoption by Viśvāmitra, to the divine lore (daiva veda) of the Gāthins and the lordship of the Jahnus. That in fact this tradition is correct seems most improbable, but it serves at least to illustrate the existence of seers of royal origin. Such figures appear more than once in the Pañcavimśa Brāhmana, which knows the technical terms Rājanyarçi and Devarājan corresponding to the later Rājarṣi, royal sage.’ The Jaiminiya Brāhmaṇa says of one who knows a certain doctrine, ‘being a king he becomes a seer’ (rājā sann rsir bhavati), and the Jaiminiya Upanisad Brāhmana applies the term Rāj'anya to a Brāhmaṇa. Again, it is argued that Devāpi Árstiseṇa, who acted as Purohita, according to the Rigveda, for śantanu, was a prince, as Yāska says or implies he was. But this assumption seems to be only an error of Yāska’s. Since nothing in the Rigveda alludes to any relationship, it is impossible to accept Sieg’s view that the Rigveda recognizes the two as brothers, but presents the fact of a prince acting the part of Purohita as unusual and requiring explanation. The principle, however, thus accepted by Sieg as to princes in the Rigveda seems sound enough. Again, Muir has argued that Hindu tradition, as shown in Sāyaṇa, regards many hymns of the Rigveda as composed by royal personages, but he admits that in many cases the ascription is wrong; it may be added that in the case of Prthī Vainya, where the hymn ascribed to him seems to be his, it is not shown in the hymn itself that he is other than a seer; the śatapatha Brāhmaṇa calls him a king, but that is probably of no more value than the later tradition as to Viśvāmitra. The case of Viśvantara and the śyāparṇas mentioned in the Aitareya Brāhmaṇa has been cited as that of a king sacrificing without priestly aid, but the interpretation iś quite uncertain, while the parallel of the Kaśyapas, Asitamrgas, and Bhūtavīras mentioned in the course of the narrative renders it highly probable that the king had other priests to carry out the sacrifice. Somewhat different are a series of other cases found in the Upaniṣads, where the Brahma doctrine is ascribed to royal persons. Thus Janaka is said in the śatapatha Brāhmaṇa to have become a Brahman; Ajātaśatru taught Gārgya Bālāki Pravāhaṇa Jaivali instructed śvetaketu Áruṇeya, as well as śilaka śālāvatya and Caikitāyana Dālbhya; and Aśvapati Kaikeya taught Brahmins. It has been deduced from such passages that the Brahma doctrine was a product of the Kṣatriyas. This conclusion is, however, entirely doubtful, for kings were naturally willing to be flattered by the ascription to them of philosophic activity, and elsewhere the opinion of a Rājanya is treated with contempt. It is probably a fair deduction that the royal caste did not much concern itself with the sacred lore of the priests, though it is not unlikely that individual exceptions occurred. But that warriors became priests, that an actual change of caste took place, is quite unproved by a single genuine example. That it was impossible we cannot say, but it seems not to have taken place. To be distinguished from a caste change, as Fick points out, is the fact that a member of any caste could, in the later period at least, become a śramaṇa, as is recorded in effect of many kings in the Epic. Whether the practice is Vedic is not clear: Yāska records it of Devāpi, but this is not evidence for times much anterior to the rise of Buddhism. On the other hand, the Brahmins, or at least the Purohitas, accompanied the princes in battle, and probably, like the mediaeval clergy, were not unprepared to fight, as Vasistha and Viśvāmitra seem to have done, and as priests do even in the Epic from time to time. But a priest cannot be said to change caste by acting in this way. More generally the possibility of the occurrence of change of caste may be seen in the Satapatha Brāhmaṇa,138 where śyāparṇa Sāyakāyana is represented as speaking of his off¬spring as if they could have become the nobles, priests, and commons of the śalvas; and in the Aitareya Brāhmana,139 where Viśvantara is told that if the wrong offering were made his children would be of the three other castes. A drunken Rṣi of the Rigveda140 talks as if he could be converted into a king. On the other hand, certain kings, such as Para Átṇāra, are spoken of as performers of Sattras, ‘sacrificial sessions.’ As evidence for caste exchange all this amounts to little; later a Brahmin might become a king, while the Rṣi in the Rigveda is represented as speaking in a state of intoxication; the great kings could be called sacrificers if, for the nonce, they were consecrated (dīksita), and so temporarily became Brahmins.The hypothetical passages, too, do not help much. It would be unwise to deny the possibility of caste exchange, but it is not clearly indicated by any record. Even cases like that of Satyakāma Jābāla do not go far; for ex hypothesi that teacher did not know who his father was, and the latter could quite well have been a Brahmin. It may therefore be held that the priests and the nobles practised hereditary occupations, and that either class was a closed body into which a man must be born. These two Varṇas may thus be fairly regarded as castes. The Vaiśyas offer more difficulty, for they practised a great variety of occupations (see Vaiśya). Fick concludes that there is no exact sense in which they can be called a caste, since, in the Buddhist literature, they were divided into various groups, which themselves practised endogamy such as the gahapatis, or smaller landowners, the setthis, or large merchants and members of the various guilds, while there are clear traces in the legal textbooks of a view that Brāhmana and Kṣatriya stand opposed to all the other members of the community. But we need hardly accept this view for Vedic times, when the Vaiśya, the ordinary freeman of the tribe, formed a class or caste in all probability, which was severed by its free status from the śūdras, and which was severed by its lack of priestly or noble blood from the two higher classes in the state. It is probably legitimate to hold that any Vaiśya could marry any member of the caste, and that the later divisions within the category of Vaiśyas are growths of divisions parallel with the original process by which priest and noble had grown into separate entities. The process can be seen to-day when new tribes fall under the caste system: each class tries to elevate itself in the social scale by refusing to intermarry with inferior classes on equal terms—hypergamy is often allowed—and so those Vaiśyas who acquired wealth in trade (śreṣthin) or agriculture (the Pāli Gahapatis) would become distinct, as sub-castes, from the ordinary Vaiśyas. But it is not legitimate to regard Vaiśya as a theoretic caste; rather it is an old caste which is in process of dividing into innumerable sub-castes under influences of occupation, religion, or geographical situation. Fick denies also that the śūdras ever formed a single caste: he regards the term as covering the numerous inferior races and tribes defeated by the Aryan invaders, but originally as denoting only one special tribe. It is reasonable to suppose that śūdra was the name given by the Vedic Indians to the nations opposing them, and that these ranked as slaves beside the three castes—nobles, priests, and people—just as in the Anglo-Saxon and early German constitution beside the priests, the nobiles or eorls, and the ingenui, ordinary freemen or ceorls, there was a distinct class of slaves proper; the use of a generic expression to cover them seems natural, whatever its origin (see śūdra). In the Aryan view a marriage of śūdras could hardly be regulated by rules; any śūdra could wed another, if such a marriage could be called a marriage at all, for a slave cannot in early law be deemed to be capable of marriage proper. But what applied in the early Vedic period became no doubt less and less applicable later when many aboriginal tribes and princes must have come into the Aryan community by peaceful means, or by conquest, without loss of personal liberty, and when the term śūdra would cover many sorts of people who were not really slaves, but were freemen of a humble character occupied in such functions as supplying the numerous needs of the village, like the Caṇdālas, or tribes living under Aryan control, or independent, such as the Niṣādas. But it is also probable that the śūdras came to include men of Aryan race, and that the Vedic period saw the degradation of Aryans to a lower social status. This seems, at any rate, to have been the case with the Rathakāras. In the Taittirīya Brāhmaṇa the Rathakāra is placed as a special class along with the Brāhmaṇas, Rājanyas, and Vaiśyas: this can hardly be interpreted except to mean that the Rathakāras were not included in the Aryan classes, though it is just possible that only a subdivision of the Vaiśyas is meant. There is other evidence that the Rathakāras were regarded as śūdras. But in the Atharvaveda the Rathakāras and the Karmāras appear in a position of importance in connexion with the selection of the king; these two classes are also referred to in an honourable way in the Vājasaneyi Sarphitā; in the śata¬patha Brāhmaṇa, too, the Rathakāra is mentioned as a a person of high standing. It is impossible to accept the view suggested by Fick that these classes were originally non- Aryan ; we must recognize that the Rathakāras, in early Vedic times esteemed for their skill, later became degraded because of the growth of the feeling that manual labour was not dignified. The development of this idea was a departure from the Aryan conception; it is not unnatural, however undesirable, and has a faint parallel in the class distinctions of modern Europe. Similarly, the Karmāra, the Takṣan the Carmamna, or ‘tanner,’ the weaver and others, quite dignified occupations in the Rigveda, are reckoned as śūdras in the Pāli texts. The later theory, which appears fully developed in the Dharma Sūtras, deduces the several castes other than the original four from the intermarriage of the several castes. This theory has no justification in the early Vedic literature. In some cases it is obviously wrong; for example, the Sūta is said to be a caste of this kind, whereas it is perfectly clear that if the Sūtas did form a caste, it was one ultimately due to occupation. But there is no evidence at all that the Sūtas, Grāmaηīs, and other members of occupations were real castes in the sense that they were endogamic in the early Vedic period. All that we can say is that there was a steady progress by which caste after caste was formed, occupation being an important determining feature, just as in modern times there are castes bearing names like Gopāla (cowherd ’) Kaivarta or Dhīvara ('fisherman'), and Vaṇij (‘merchant’). Fick finds in the Jātakas mention of a number of occupations whose members did not form part of any caste at all, such as the attendants on the court, the actors and dancers who went from village to village, and the wild tribes that lived in the mountains, fishermen, hunters, and so on. In Vedic times these people presumably fell under the conception of śūdra, and may have included the Parṇaka, Paulkasa, Bainda, who are mentioned with many others in the Vājasaneyi Samhitā and the Taittirīya Brāhmaṇa in the list of victims at the Puruṣamedha (‘human sacrifice’). The slaves also, whom Fick includes in the same category, were certainly included in the term śūdra. 5. Origin of the Castes.—The question of the origin of the castes presents some difficulty. The ultimate cause of the extreme rigidity of the caste system, as compared with the features of any other Aryan society, must probably be sought in the sharp distinction drawn from the beginning between the Aryan and the śūdra. The contrast which the Vedic Indians felt as existing between themselves and the conquered population, and which probably rested originally on the difference of colour between the upper and the lower classes, tended to accentuate the natural distinctions of birth, occupation, and locality which normally existed among the Aryan Indians, but which among other Aryan peoples never developed into a caste system like that of India. The doctrine of hypergamy which marks the practical working of the caste system, seems clearly to point to the feeling that the Aryan could marry the śūdrā, but not the śūdra the Aryā. This distinction probably lies at the back of all other divisions: its force may be illustrated by the peculiar state of feeling as to mixed marriages, for example, in the Southern States of America and in South Africa, or even in India itself, between the new invaders from Europe and the mingled population which now peoples the country. Marriages between persons of the white and the dark race are disapproved in principle, but varying degrees of condemnation attach to (1) the marriage of a man of the white race with a woman of the dark race; (2) an informal connexion between these two; (3) a marriage between a woman of the white race and a man of the dark race; and (4) an informal connexion between these two. Each category, on the whole, is subject to more severe reprobation than the preceding one. This race element, it would seem, is what has converted social divisions into castes. There appears, then, to be a large element of truth in the theory, best represented by Risley, which explains caste in the main as a matter of blood, and which holds that the higher the caste is, the greater is the proportion of Aryan blood. The chief rival theory is undoubtedly that of Senart, which places the greatest stress on the Aryan constitution of the family. According to Senart the Aryan people practised in affairs of marriage both a rule of exogamy, and one of endogamy. A man must marry a woman of equal birth, but not one of the same gens, according to Roman law as interpreted by Senart and Kovalevsky ; and an Athenian must marry an Athenian woman, but not one of the same γez/oç. In India these rules are reproduced in the form that one must not marry within the Gotra, but not without the caste. The theory, though attractively developed, is not convincing; the Latin and Greek parallels are not even probably accurate ; and in India the rule forbidding marriage within the Gotra is one which grows in strictness as the evidence grows later in date. On the other hand, it is not necessary to deny that the development of caste may have been helped by the family traditions of some gentes, or Gotras. The Patricians of Rome for a long time declined intermarriage with the plebeians; the Athenian Eupatridai seem to have kept their yevη pure from contamination by union with lower blood; and there may well have been noble families among the Vedic Indians who intermarried only among themselves. The Germans known to Tacitus163 were divided into nobiles and ingenui, and the Anglo-Saxons into eorls and ceorls, noble and non-noble freemen.1®4 The origin of nobility need not be sought in the Vedic period proper, for it may already have existed. It may have been due to the fact that the king, whom we must regard as originally elected by the people, was as king often in close relation with, or regarded as an incarnation of, the deity;165 and that hereditary kingship would tend to increase the tradition of especially sacred blood: thus the royal family and its offshoots would be anxious to maintain the purity of their blood. In India, beside the sanctity of the king, there was the sanctity of the priest. Here we have in the family exclusiveness of king and nobles, and the similar exclusiveness of a priesthood which was not celibate, influences that make for caste, especially when accompanying the deep opposition between the general folk and the servile aborigines. Caste, once created, naturally developed in different directions. Nesfield166 was inclined to see in occupation the one ground of caste. It is hardly necessary seriously to criticize this view considered as an ultimate explanation of caste, but it is perfectly certain that gilds of workers tend to become castes. The carpenters (Tak§an), the chariot-makers (Rathakāra), the fisher¬men (Dhaivara) and others are clearly of the type of caste, and the number extends itself as time goes on. But this is not to say that caste is founded on occupation pure and simple in its first origin, or that mere difference of occupation would have produced the system of caste without the interposition of the fundamental difference between Aryan and Dāsa or śūdra blood and colour. This difference rendered increasingly important what the history of the Aryan peoples shows us to be declining, the distinction between the noble and the non-noble freemen, a distinction not of course ultimate, but one which seems to have been developed in the Aryan people before the separation of its various.branches. It is well known that the Iranian polity presents a division of classes comparable in some respects with the Indian polity. The priests (Athravas) and warriors (Rathaesthas) are unmistakably parallel, and the two lower classes seem to correspond closely to the Pāli Gahapatis, and perhaps to the śūdras. But they are certainly not castes in the Indian sense of the word. There is no probability in the view of Senart or of Risley that the names of the old classes were later superimposed artificially on a system of castes that were different from them in origin. We cannot say that the castes existed before the classes, and that the classes were borrowed by India from Iran, as Risley maintains, ignoring the early Brāhmaṇa evidence for the four Varnas, and treating the transfer as late. Nor can we say with Senart that the castes and classes are of independent origin. If there had been no Varṇa, caste might never have arisen; both colour and class occupation are needed for a plausible account of the rise of caste.
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akṣo na cakryoḥ śūra bṛhan RV.6.24.3a.
arāṇāṃ na caramas tad eṣām RV.8.20.14c.
āśuṃ na cakraṃ rathyeva raṃhyā RV.4.1.3b; KS.26.11b.
aśvāso na caṅkramata RV.8.55.4c.
aśvo na cakrado vṛṣā RV.9.64.3a; SV.2.133a; Apś.12.19.5a.
dyaur na cakradad bhiyā RV.8.7.26c.
ekān na catvāriṃśate svāhā TS.7.2.11.1; 12.1; 14.1. See ekonaca-.
gāṃ na carṣaṇīsaham RV.8.1.2b; AVś.20.85.2b; SV.2.711b; JB.3.293b.
nemiṃ na cakram arvato raghudru RV.10.61.16d.
tejo na cakṣur akṣyoḥ VS.21.48c; MS.3.11.5c: 147.2; TB.2.6.14.1c.
yasyāpamṛtyur na ca mṛtyuḥ RVKh.10.142.10c (M"uller's edition).
yavaṃ na carkṛṣad vṛṣā RV.1.176.2d.
agninā varuṇena ca # AVP.3.3.2d. Cf. mitreṇa varu-.
agnīc cātvāle vasatīvarībhiḥ pratyupatiṣṭhāsai hotṛcamasena ca # śB.3.9.3.16; Kś.9.3.6.
anuhāya tapasā manyunā ca (AVP. cota, but the word uta properly belongs to the next pāda) # AVś.5.18.9c; AVP.9.18.2c.
anena ca tvā prīṇāmy anena ca # śB.9.3.2.5.
anena ca tvābhiṣiñcāmy anena ca # śB.9.3.2.5.
antarā mitrāvaruṇā carantī # VS.29.6a; TS.5.1.11.2a; MS.3.16.2a: 184.8; KSA.6.2a.
araṇyeṣu jarbhurāṇā caranti # RV.1.163.11d; VS.29.22d; TS.4.6.7.4d; KSA.6.3d.
arpitāḥ ṣaṣṭir na calācalāsaḥ # RV.1.164.48d; N.4.27. See ṣaṣṭiś ca khīlā.
avartayat sūryo na cakram # RV.2.11.20c.
aśrāyi yajñaḥ sūrye na cakṣuḥ # RV.6.11.5d; TB.2.4.3.2d.
aśvena ca rathena ca vajrī # TS.4.4.8.1.
asyāṃ tvā dhruvāyāṃ madhyamāyāṃ pratiṣṭhāyāṃ diśi sādhyāś cāptyāś ca devāḥ ṣaḍbhiś caiva pañcaviṃśair ahobhir abhiṣiñcantv etena ca tṛcenaitena ca yajuṣaitābhiś ca vyāhṛtibhī rājyāya māhārājyādhipatyāya svāvaśyāyādhiṣṭhāya # AB.8.19.1.
āpaś ca mitraṃ dhiṣaṇā ca sādhan # RV.1.96.1c; MS.4.10.6c: 157.13.
āpūryā sthā mā pūrayata prajayā ca dhanena ca # TS.3.2.5.5; Aś.6.12.4. P: āpūryā sthā mā pūrayata Apś.13.17.8. See under āpura stā.
āhaṃ dīkṣām aruham ṛtasya patnīṃ gāyatreṇa chandasā brahmaṇā ca # TS.7.1.18.2; KSA.1.9; TB.3.7.7.4; Apś.10.9.4.
indrā ha yo varuṇā cakra āpī # RV.4.41.2a.
indreṇa varuṇena candreṇa sūryeṇa ca # AVP.1.4.2a. Probably not a verse, but a gloss listing four ūhas to be applied to the word parjanyaṃ in pāda b of the preceding stanza (see Zehnder's edition of kāṇḍa 2, p. 253).
īkṣeṇyāso ahyo na cāravaḥ # RV.9.77.3c.
ugreṇa ca devena ca kṣiptasya # AVP.15.17.1a.
udīcyāṃ tvā diśi viśve devāḥ ṣaḍbhiś caiva pañcaviṃśair ahobhir abhiṣiñcantv etena ca tṛceṇaitena ca yajuṣaitābhiś ca vyāhṛtibhir vairājyāya # AB.8.19.1. Cf. viśve devā udīcyāṃ.
udgātar apa tvā vṛṇe śatena ca niṣkeṇa cāśvo ma udgāsyati # Lś.9.9.19.
udgātar upa tvā hvaye śatena caiva niṣkeṇa ca tvam eva ma udgāsyasi # Lś.9.9.21.
upec chivena cakṣuṣā # śś.8.11.14a.
ūrubhyāṃ jaghanena ca # AVP.1.112.5b.
ūrdhvāyāṃ tvā diśi marutaś cāṅgirasaś ca devāḥ ṣaḍbhiś caiva pañcaviṃśair ahobhir abhiṣiñcantv etena ca tṛcenaitena ca yajuṣaitābhiś ca vyāhṛtibhiḥ pārāmeṣṭhyāya # AB.8.19.1.
ṛju marteṣu vṛjinā ca paśyan # RV.4.1.17d; 6.51.2c; 7.60.2d.
ṛṇor akṣaṃ na cakryoḥ # RV.1.30.14c; AVś.20.122.2c; SV.2.435c.
ekonacatvāriṃśate svāhā # KSA.2.1,2,4. See ekān na ca-.
evā me aśvinā cakṣuḥ # AVP.2.81.4c. Cf. next, and tāvan me.
kāṅkṣata nābhikṛntanena stanapratidhānena ca # GG.2.7.17.
kṣīreṇa codakena ca # TA.6.4.1d.
garbhaṃ dadhānām ṛtunā carantīm # AVP.6.10.1d.
gītyā stomena saha prastāvena ca # GB.1.5.24d.
gobhir yavaṃ na carkṛṣat # RV.1.23.15c.
cakṣuṣā hṛdayena ca # AVś.5.21.2b.
candreṇa sūryeṇa ca # AVP.1.4.2b.
tād evedaṃ tātṛpāṇā carāmi # RV.10.95.16d; śB.11.5.1.10d.
tān anv ārohāmi tapasā brahmaṇā ca # JB.2.52d (ter). Cf. tān ā tiṣṭhati.
tāvan me aśvinā varcaḥ # AVś.3.22.4e; AVP.3.18.5c. Cf. under evā me aśvinā cakṣuḥ.
dakṣiṇasyāṃ tvā diśi rudrā devāḥ ṣaḍbhiś caiva pañcaviṃśair ahobhir abhiṣiñcantv etena ca tṛcenaitena ca yajuṣaitābhiś ca vyāhṛtibhir bhaujyāya # AB.8.19.1. See prec.
dhanyā ca dhiṣaṇā ca # śś.8.19.1.
na krodho na ca mātsaryam # RVKh.5.87.20a.
na ca vyāghrabhayaṃ na ca mṛtyubhayam # RVKh.10.142.10b (M"uller's edition).
na corabhayaṃ na ca sarpabhayam # RVKh.10.142.10a (M"uller's edition).
ni ṣa hīyatāṃ tanvā tanā ca # RV.7.104.10d; AVś.8.4.10d.
paraḥ so astu tanvā tanā ca # RV.7.104.11a; AVś.8.4.11a.
parīṃ ghṛṇā carati titviṣe śavaḥ # RV.1.52.6a.
pavitreṇa savena ca # RV.9.67.25b; AVś.6.19.3b; VS.19.43b; MS.3.11.10b: 155.17. KS.38.2b; TB.1.4.8.2b.
pārṣṇyā prapadena ca # AVś.6.42.3b.
puchena cāsyena ca # AVś.7.56.8b; AVP.4.17.2b.
punar yuvānā carathāya takṣatha # RV.4.36.3d.
pūrveṇa cāpareṇa ca # AVś.10.4.3b; AG.2.3.3b; śG.4.18.1b; PG.2.14.4b; ApMB.2.17.26b; HG.2.16.8b; MG.2.7.1b.
pṛṣṭheva vītā vṛjinā ca martān # RV.4.2.11b; TS.5.5.4.4b; KS.40.5b.
prajayā ca dhanena ca # AVś.7.33.1d; 81.3d; 14.1.48e; 19.31.7b; 64.2d; AVP.6.18.1d--9d; 6.19.1d--9d; 10.5.7b; 12.19.8d; VS.20.22e; VSK.3.3.28d; TS.4.6.3.1d; KS.4.13b; 35.3d; śB.12.9.2.9; TB.2.6.6.5e; Apś.5.14.5d; śG.2.10.3b; Kauś.36.18d; ApMB.2.6.7b; PG.3.12.10d. See āyuṣā ca.
pratīcyāṃ tvā diśy ādityā devāḥ ṣaḍbhiś caiva pañcaviṃśair ahobhir abhiṣiñcantv etena ca tṛcenaitena ca yajuṣaitābhiś ca vyāhṛtibhiḥ svārājyāya # AB.8.19.1. Cf. prec.
pratnena dharuṇena ca # JB.2.13b.
prācyāṃ tvā diśi vasavo devāḥ ṣaḍbhiś caiva pañcaviṃśair ahobhir abhiṣiñcantv etena ca tṛcenaitena ca yajuṣaitābhiś ca vyāhṛtibhiḥ sāmrājyāya # AB.8.19.1. Cf. prec.
bhūtena gupto bhavyena cāham # AVś.17.1.29b.
manasā hṛdayena ca # AVś.3.20.9d; AVP.3.34.10d; 7.9.3b; SMB.2.2.8b.
no ghoreṇa caratābhi dhṛṣṇu # RV.10.34.14b.
mām āryanti kṛtena kartvena ca # RV.10.48.3d.
mitreṇa varuṇena ca # AVś.3.6.2d; TA.6.9.2d. Cf. agninā varu-.
yaṃ kāvyena caturo vicakra # RV.4.35.4b.
yajñaś ca tvā dakṣiṇā ca dakṣiṇe saṃdhau gopāyetām # PG.3.4.11.
yajñaś ca tvā dakṣiṇā ca śrīṇītām # KS.35.11.
yan mājihīta vayunā canānuṣak # RV.10.49.5b.
yan me manaso na priyaṃ na cakṣuṣaḥ # AVś.9.2.2a.
yamasya balinā carāmi # TB.3.7.9.8b; Apś.13.22.5b. See yamasya yena, and yena yamasya.
yamasya yena balinā carāmi # AVś.6.117.1b. See under yamasya balinā.
yaśasā ca bhagena ca # PG.2.6.17d,23d.
te agna utsīdataḥ pavamānā priyā tanūs tayā saha pṛthivīm āviśa rathaṃtareṇa sāmnā gāyatreṇa ca chandasā # Apś.5.26.5. Quasi-metrical, five pādas.
te agne pāvakā yā manasā preyasī priyā tanūs tayā sahāntarikṣam āviśa vāmadevyena sāmnā traiṣṭubhena ca chandasā # Apś.5.26.5. Quasi-metrical.
te agne sūrye śuciḥ priyā tanūḥ śukre 'dhy-adhi saṃbhṛtā tayā saha divam āviśa bṛhatā sāmnā jāgatena ca chandasā # Apś.5.26.5. Quasi-metrical.
sahamānā carasi # AVP.5.1.6a; 6.8.3a. See yaḥ sahamānaś.
yās te agne ghorās tanuvaḥ kṣuc ca tṛṣṇā cāsnuk cānāhutiś cāśanayā ca pipāsā ca sediś cāmatiś caitās te agne ghorās tanuvas tābhir amuṃ gacha yo 'smān dveṣṭi yaṃ ca vayaṃ dviṣmaḥ # TA.4.22.1. Cf. next.
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"na ca" has 1 results.
     
caṅgudāsaor चाड्गुदास a scholar of grammar who has written an independent work on Sanskrit Vyakaana called वैयाकरणजीवातु. The treatise is also known as चाङ्गुसूत्र or चाङ्गु-व्याकरण.
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48 results
     
na ca and also notSB 6.3.27
na ca and also notSB 6.3.27
na ca and notSB 4.2.9
na ca and notSB 4.2.9
na ca norCC Adi 6.102
na ca norCC Adi 6.102
CC Madhya 2.18
na ca norCC Madhya 2.18
SB 10.16.37
na ca norSB 10.16.37
SB 10.29.16
na ca norSB 10.29.16
SB 10.38.22
na ca norSB 10.38.22
SB 10.48.18
na ca norSB 10.48.18
SB 10.68.47
na ca norSB 10.68.47
SB 10.87.24
na ca norSB 10.87.24
SB 11.28.8
na ca norSB 11.28.8
SB 12.6.34
na ca norSB 12.6.34
na ca vyathe nor am I suffering very muchSB 8.22.6-7
na ca vyathe nor am I suffering very muchSB 8.22.6-7
na ca vyathe nor am I suffering very muchSB 8.22.6-7
na cacāla did not moveSB 10.78.8
na cacāla did not moveSB 10.78.8
na cakruḥ did not maintainSB 10.20.17
na cakruḥ did not maintainSB 10.20.17
na cakṣmahe we do not seeSB 10.47.5
na cakṣmahe we do not seeSB 10.47.5
na calasi you do not moveSB 10.90.22
na calasi you do not moveSB 10.90.22
na calataḥ are not movingSB 10.29.34
na calataḥ are not movingSB 10.29.34
na calati he does not go awaySB 11.2.53
na calati he does not go awaySB 11.2.53
na calet does not deviateSB 10.29.40
na calet does not deviateSB 10.29.40
na calet should not deviateSB 11.7.37
na calet should not deviateSB 11.7.37
vṛndāvana calilā prabhu Śrī Caitanya Mahāprabhu has departed for VṛndāvanaCC Madhya 19.31
vandilena caraṇa worshiped the feetCC Madhya 25.227
vṛndāvana calilā prabhu Śrī Caitanya Mahāprabhu has departed for VṛndāvanaCC Madhya 19.31
vandilena caraṇa worshiped the feetCC Madhya 25.227
vṛndāvana calilā prabhu Śrī Caitanya Mahāprabhu has departed for VṛndāvanaCC Madhya 19.31
Ayurvedic Medical
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uddālaka

1. a kind of honey; 2. Plant seeds of Vigna catiang; 3. Plant Assyrian plum, Cordia myxa.

Parse Time: 1.331s Search Word: na ca Input Encoding: IAST IAST: na ca