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     Amarakosha Search  
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WordReferenceGenderNumberSynonymsDefinition
javana2.8.46MasculineSingularjavādhikaḥ
javana2.4.38NeuterSingularjūtiḥ
sūnā3.3.120FeminineSingularjavanam, āpyāyanam, pratīvāpaḥ
vegī2.8.74MasculineSingulartvaritaḥ, prajavī, javana, javaḥ, tarasvī
sañjavanamNeuterSingularcatuḥśālam
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Devanagari
BrahmiEXPERIMENTAL
javanamf(ī-)n. (gaRa dṛḍhādi-;oxyt. ) quick, swift, fleet etc. View this entry on the original dictionary page scan.
javanam. a fleet horse View this entry on the original dictionary page scan.
javanam. a kind of deer View this entry on the original dictionary page scan.
javanam. Name of one of skanda-'s attendants View this entry on the original dictionary page scan.
javanam. plural for yav- q.v View this entry on the original dictionary page scan.
javanan. speed, velocity View this entry on the original dictionary page scan.
javanan. Name of a plant View this entry on the original dictionary page scan.
javanan. see dhī-j/av-. View this entry on the original dictionary page scan.
ājavanan. ( ju-), only for the etymol. of āj/i-, q.v View this entry on the original dictionary page scan.
dhījavana mfn. inspiring she mind or rousing devotion View this entry on the original dictionary page scan.
paijavanam. (fr. pijavana-) patronymic of su-dās- and of several men View this entry on the original dictionary page scan.
pijavanam. Name of a man (see paijavana-). View this entry on the original dictionary page scan.
prajavanamfn. running very quickly View this entry on the original dictionary page scan.
saṃjavanan. (fr. saṃ-ju-;perhaps for saṃ-yavana-fr. saṃ--1. yu-) a group of four houses, quadrangle View this entry on the original dictionary page scan.
saṃjavanan. a way-mark, sign-post () View this entry on the original dictionary page scan.
vaijavana wrong reading for paijavana-. View this entry on the original dictionary page scan.
     Apte Search  
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javana जवन a. (-नी f.) [जु भावे ल्युट्] Quick, swift, fleet; R.9.56. -नः 1 A courser, a swift horse. -2 An elephant in the third decade; Mātaṅga L.5.13. -नम् Speed, quickness, velocity.
prajavana प्रजवन a. Swift, fleet; व्यावल्गत् प्रजवनवाजिना रथेन U.5.1 (v. l.).
saṃjavanam संजवनम् 1 A quadrangle; a group of four houses forming a court. -2 A way-mark, sign-post.
     Vedic Index of
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divodāsa atithigva Is one of the leading princes of the early Vedic age. He was a son of Vadhryaśva, and father, or more probably grandfather, of Sudās, the famous king of the Trtsu family, among the Bharatas. Probably Pijavana was the son and Sudās the grandson. Divodāsa was naturally a Bharata, and, like Sudās, was an opponent of the Turvaśas and Yadus. His great enemy was śambara, the Dāsa, who was apparently chief of a mountain people, and whom he repeatedly defeated. He was also, it seems, like his father Vadhryaśva, an energetic supporter of the fire ritual, for Agni is once called by his name in the Rigveda. On the other hand, he was defeated, with Ayu and Kutsa, by Indra’s aid. In several passages he seems closely connected with the singer family, the Bharadvājas. From one passage, where Divodāsa is said to have fought against the Panis, the Pārāvatas, and Brsaya, Hillebrandt has inferred that he was engaged in conflicts with the tribes of Arachosia, and interpreting the name as the ‘heavenly Dāsa’ conjectures that he was himself a Dāsa. This conclusion is not probable, for the Sarasvatī on which the battle in question took place, and which can hardly be the Haraqaiti of Arachosia, would naturally designate the later Sarasvatī, while the Pārāvatas are mentioned in the Pañcavimśa Brāhmana, as in the east, about the Yamunā. Bergaigne’s opinion that Divodāsa and Atithigva were different people cannot be supported in view of the complete parallelism in the acts of the two persons. See also Pratardana. The people of Divodāsa are referred to in a hymn of the Rigveda.
devavant Is mentioned in a Dānastuti (‘ Praise of Gifts ’) in the Rigveda as the ancestor of Sudās, apparently his grand­father; or if Pijavana be accepted as Sudās’ father, and Divodāsa as his grandfather, then his great-great-grandfather, and father of Vadhryaśva. The succession in the latter case would then be Devavant, Vadhryaśva, Divodāsa, Pijavana, Sudās.
pijavana Is the name of the father of Sudās according to the Nirukta. Probably this statement is based on a mere con­jecture from the epithet Paijavana used of Sudās in a verse of the Rigveda, but may very well be correct.
paijavana ‘Descendant of Pyavana,’ is the patronymic of Sudās. It seems most probable that Pijavana intervened in the line of succession between Divodāsa and Sudās, because the two kings have, according to tradition, quite different Purohitas, the former being served by the Bharadvājas as his priests, the latter by Vasiṣtha and Viávāmitra ; this is more natural if they were divided by a period of time than if they had been, as is usually supposed, father and son. Geldner, how­ever, identifies Divodāsa and Pijavana.
bharata Is the name of a people of great importance in the Rigveda and the later literature. In the Rigveda they appear prominently in the third and seventh Maṇdalas in connexion with Sudās and the Tftsus, while in the sixth Maṇdala they are associated with Divodāsa. In one passage the Bharatas are, like the Tṛtsus, enemies of the Pūrus: there can be little doubt that Ludwig’s view of the identity of the Bharatas and and Tṛtsus is practically correct. More precisely Oldenberg considers that the Tṛtsus are the Vasiṣhas, the family singers of the Bharatas; while Geldner recognizes, with perhaps more probability, in the Tṛtsus the royal family of the Bharatas. That the Tṛtsus and Bharatas were enemies, as Zimmer holds, is most improbable even on geographical grounds, for the Tṛtsus in Zimmer’s view occupied the country to the east of the Paruçṇī (Ravi), and the Bharatas must therefore be regarded as coming against the Tṛtsus from the west, whereas the Rigveda recognizes two Bharata chiefs on the Sarasvatī, Ápayā, and Dpçadvatī that is, in the holy land of India, the Madhyadeśa. Hillebrandt sees in the connexion of the Tṛtsus and the Bharatas a fusion of two tribes; but this is not supported by any evidence beyond the fact that in his opinion some such theory is needed to explain Divodāsa's appearing in connexion with the Bharadvāja family, while Sudās, his son, or perhaps grandson {cf. Pijavana), is connected with the Vasiṣthas and the Viśvāmitras. In the later literature the Bharatas appear as especially famous. The śatapatha Brāhmaṇa mentions Bharata Dauh- ṣanti as a king, sacrificer of the Aśvamedha (‘ horse sacrifice ’) and śatānīka Sātrājita, as another Bharata who offered that sacrifice. The Aitareya Brāhmaṇa mentions Bharata Dauh- ṣanti as receiving the kingly coronation from Dlrghatamas Māmateya, and śatānīka as being consecrated by Somaśuçman Vājaratnāyana, a priest whose name is of quite late origin. The geographical position of the Bharata people is clearly shown by the fact that the Bharata kings win victories over the Kāśis, and make offerings on the Yamunā (Jumna) and Gañgfā (Ganges). Moreover, in the formula of the king’s proclamation for the people, the variants recorded include Kuravah, Pañcālāh, Kuru-Pañcālāh,, and Bharatāh ; and the Mahābhārata consistently recognizes the royal family of the Kurus as a Bharata family. It is therefore extremely probable that Oldenberg is right in holding that the Bharatas in the times of the Brāhmaṇas were merging in the Kuru-Pañcāla people. The ritual practices of the Bharatas are repeatedly mentioned in the Pañcavimśa Brāhmaṇa, the Aitareya Brāhmaṇa, the śatapatha Brāhmaṇa, and the Taittirīya Aranyaka. Already in the Rigveda there is mention made of Agni Bhārata (‘of the Bharatas’). In the Apr! hymns occurs a goddess Bhāratī, the personified divine protective power of the Bharatas : her association in the hymns with Sarasvatī reflects the connexion 'of the Bharatas with the Sarasvatī in the Rigveda. Again, in the śatapatha Brāhmaṇa Agni is referred to as brāhmana Bhārata, ‘priest of the Bharatas,’ and is invited to dispose of the offering Manusvat Bharatavat, ‘like Manu,’ ‘like Bharata.’ In one or two passages Sudās or Divodāsa and, on the other hand, Purukutsa or Trasadasyu appear in a friendly relation. Possibly this points, as Oldenberg suggests, to the union of Bharatas and Pūrus with the Kurus. A Bharata is referred to in the fifth Mandala of the Rigveda who he was is uncertain.
vasiṣṭha Is the name of one of the most prominent priestly figures of Vedic tradition. The seventh Maṇdala of the Rigveda is ascribed to him ; this ascription is borne out by the fact that the Vasisthas and Vasistha are frequently mentioned in that Maṇdala, besides being sometimes referred to elsewhere. That by the name Vasiṣçha a definite individual is always meant is most improbable, as Oldenberg shows; Vasiṣtha must normally mean simply ‘ a Vasiṣtfia.’ But it is not necessary to deny that a real Vasiṣtha existed, for one hymn seems to show clear traces of his authorship, and of his assist­ance to Sudās against the ten kings. The most important feature of Vasiṣtha’s life was apparently his hostility to Viśvāmitra. The latter was certainly at one time the Purohita (‘ domestic priest ’) of Sudās, but he seems to have been deposed from that post, to have joined Sudās’ enemies, and to have taken part in the onslaught of the kings against him, for the hymn of Sudās’ triumph has clear references to the ruin Viśvāmitra brought on his allies. Oldenberg, however, holds that the strife of Viśvāmitra and Vasistha is not to be found in the Rigveda. On the other hand, Geldner is hardly right in finding in the Rigveda a compressed account indicating the rivalry of śakti, Vasiṣṭha’s son, with Viśvāmitra, the acquisition by Viśvāmitra of special skill in speech, and the revenge of Viśvāmitra, who secured the death of śakti by Sudās’ servants, an account which is more fully related by Sadguruśiṣya, which appeared in the śātyāya- naka, and to which reference seems to be made in the brief notices of the Taittirīya Samhitā and the Pañcavimśa Brāhmaṇa regarding Vasiṣtha's sons having been slain, and his overcoming the Saudāsas. But it is important to note that no mention is made in these authorities of Sudās himself being actually opposed to Vasistha, while in the Aitareya Brāhmaṇa Vasiṣtha appears as the Purohita and consecrator of Sudās Paijavana. Yāska recognizes Viśvāmitra as the Purohita of Sudās; this accords with what seems to have been the fact that Viśvāmitra originally held the post. Probably, however, with the disappearance of Sudās, Viśvāmitra recovered his position, whereupon Vasiṣtha in revenge for the murder of his sons secured in some way unspecified the defeat of the Saudāsas. At any rate it is hardly necessary to suppose that the enmity of the Saudāsas and Vasiṣthas was permanent. There is evidence that the Bharatas had the Vasisthas as Purohitas, while other versions regard them as Purohitas for people (prajāh) generally. It seems that the Vasiṣthas were pioneers in adopting the rule that Purohitas should act as Brahman priest at the sacrifice: the śatapatha Brāhmaṇa states that the Vasiṣthas were once the only priests to act as Brahmans, but that later any priest could serve as such. A rivalry with Jamadgni and Viśvāmitra is reported in the Taittirīya Samhitā. Parāśara and śatayātu are associated with Vasiṣtha in the Rigveda, being apparently, as Geldner thinks, the grandson and a son of Vasiṣtha. According to Pischel, in another hymn, Vasiṣtha appears as attempting to steal the goods of his father Varuṇa; Geldner also shows that the Rigveda contains a clear reference to Vasistha’s being a son of Varuṇa and the nymph Urvaśī. Perhaps this explains the fact that the Vasiṣthas are called the Tptsus in one passage of the Rigveda; for being of miraculous parentage, Vasistha would need adoption into a Gotra, that of the princes whom he served, and to whom Agastya seems to have introduced him. There are numerous other references to Vasistha as a Ṛṣi in Vedic literature, in the Sūtras, and in the Epic, where he and Viśvāmitra fight out their rivalry.
sudās Is the name of the Tṛtsu king who won a famous victory over the ten kings, as described in a hymn of the Rigveda. At one time Viśvāmitra was his Purohita, and accompanied him in his victorious raids over the Vipāś (Beās) and śutudrī (Sutlej). The Aśvins gave him a queen, Sudevī, and also helped him on another occasion. He appears with Trasadasyu in a late hymn without hint of rivalry, but elsewhere he seems to be referred to as defeated by Pupukutsa, Trasadasyu’s father. In the Aitareya Brāhmana he is recognized as a great king, with Vasiṣha as his Puro­hita, and similarly in the śāñkhāyana śrauta Sūtra, where his generosity to his priest is related. His exact ancestry is a little uncertain, because he is called Paijavana, ‘son of Pijavana,’ as Yāska explains the patro¬nymic. If this explanation is correct, Divodāsa must have been his grandfather. If he was the son of Divodāsa, Pijavana must be understood as a more remote ancestor. The former alternative seems the more probable. Cf. Turvaśa, Dāśarājña. Paijavana, Bharata, Saudāsa.
       Bloomfield Vedic
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abhī naraṃ dhījavanaṃ ratheṣṭhām # RV.9.97.49c; SV.2.776c.
arhann agne paijavanasya dānam # RV.7.18.22c.
aviṣṭanā paijavanasya ketam # RV.7.18.25c.
catvāro mā paijavanasya dānāḥ # RV.7.18.23a.
     DCS with thanks   
5 results
     
javana noun (masculine) a fleet horse (Monier-Williams, Sir M. (1988))
a horse a kind of deer (Monier-Williams, Sir M. (1988))
name of one of Skanda's attendants (Monier-Williams, Sir M. (1988))

Frequency rank 19337/72933
javana adjective fleet (Monier-Williams, Sir M. (1988))
quick (Monier-Williams, Sir M. (1988))
swift (Monier-Williams, Sir M. (1988))

Frequency rank 6140/72933
paijavana noun (masculine) patr. of Sudās and of several men (Monier-Williams, Sir M. (1988))

Frequency rank 29088/72933
prajavana adjective running very quickly (Monier-Williams, Sir M. (1988))

Frequency rank 58667/72933
saṃjavana noun (neuter) a group of four houses (Monier-Williams, Sir M. (1988))
a way-mark (Monier-Williams, Sir M. (1988))
quadrangle (Monier-Williams, Sir M. (1988))
sign-post (Monier-Williams, Sir M. (1988))

Frequency rank 40628/72933
     Wordnet Search "javana" has 7 results.
     

javana

kandajavanaspatiḥ   

saḥ vṛkṣaḥ yasya nirmitiḥ kandāt jātā।

keśaraḥ iti ekaḥ kandajavanaspatiḥ asti।

javana

vegaḥ, javaḥ, javanam, taras, raṃhatiḥ, raṃhiḥ   

niyatasamaye pratimānakaṃ ākrāntā dūratā।

kārayānaṃ navatiḥ sahasramānaṃ yāvat vegena gacchati।

javana

vaibhrājavanam, vaibhrājam   

svargastham ekam upavanam।

vaibhrājavanasya varṇanaṃ purāṇeṣu vartate।

javana

pijavana   

ekaḥ paurāṇikaḥ rājā।

pijavanaḥ pāñcālasya rājā āsīt।

javana

javana   

ekaḥ anucaraḥ ।

javanasya ullekhaḥ mahābhārate vartate

javana

javana   

ekaḥ kṣupaḥ ।

javanasya ullekhaḥ kośe vartate

javana

pijavana   

ekaḥ puruṣaḥ ।

pijavanasya ullekhaḥ nirukte vartate

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