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     Grammar Search "heta" has 1 results.
     
hetā: third person singular periphrastic perfect class parasmaipadahi
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WordReferenceGenderNumberSynonymsDefinition
mṛgayā2.10.24NeuterSingularmṛgavyam, ākheṭaḥ, ācchodanam
nikṛṣṭaḥ3.1.53MasculineSingularrephaḥ, garhyaḥ, kutsitaḥ, avamaḥ, arvā, kheṭaḥ, kupūyaḥ, yāpyaḥ, pratikṛṣṭaḥ, aṇakaḥ, avadyaḥ, adhamaḥ
kheṭakaḥ3.3.20MasculineSingularbhāvaḥ, vṛndaḥ
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Devanagari
BrahmiEXPERIMENTAL
cit cl.1. c/etati- (imperfect tense acetat- ; parasmE-pada c/etat- ) cl.2. (A1. Passive voice 3. sg. cit/e-, ; parasmE-pada f. instrumental case citantyā-, ; A1. citāna-, ) cl.3. irreg. cīhetati- (; subjunctive ciketat- ; imperative 2. sg. cikiddhi- ; parasmE-pada cikitān/a- ; perf. cik/eta- etc.; ciceta- ;3. dual number cetatur- ; A1.and Passive voice cikit/e- etc.;3. plural tre- ;for parasmE-pada cikitv/as-See sub voce, i.e. the word in the Sanskrit order; A1. Passive voice cicite- ; Aorist acetīt- ; A1. Passive voice /aceti-and c/eti- ;for acait-See 2. ci-; future 1st c/ettā-, ) to perceive, fix the mind upon, attend to, be attentive, observe, take notice of (accusative or genitive case) ; to aim at, intend, design (with dative case) ; to be anxious about, care for (accusative or genitive case), ; to resolve, ; to understand, comprehend, know (perf. often in the sense of proper) ; P. A1. to become perceptible, appear, be regarded as, be known : Causal cet/ayati-, te- (2. plural cet/ayadhvam- subjunctive cetayat- imperative 2. dual number cetayethām- imperfect tense /acetayat- ;3. plural cit/ayante- ; parasmE-pada cit/ayat- (eleven times); cet/ayat-, ; A1. cetayāna-See sub voce, i.e. the word in the Sanskrit order) to cause to attend, make attentive, remind of. ; to cause to comprehend, instruct, teach ; to observe, perceive, be intent upon ; A1. (once P. ) to form an idea in the mind, be conscious of, understand, comprehend, think, reflect upon ; P. to have a right notion of. know ; P. "to recover consciousness", awake ; A1. to remember, have consciousness of (accusative) ; to appear, be conspicuous, shine : Desiderative c/ikitsati- (fr. kit- ;exceptionally A1. ; imperative tsatu- subjunctive tsāt- Aorist 2. sg. /acikitsīs- ; Passive voice parasmE-pada cikitsyamāna- ) to have in view, aim at, be desirous ; to care for, be anxious about, ; ( ) to treat medically, cure ; to wish to appear : Causal of Desiderative (future cikitsayiṣyati-) to cure : Intensive cekite- (fr.2. ci-?,or for tte- ; parasmE-pada c/ekitat-, ; A1. c/ekitāna- eight times) to appear, be conspicuous, shine View this entry on the original dictionary page scan.
hetum. "impulse", motive, cause, cause of, reason for (locative case,rarely dative case or genitive case; hetunā-, hetoḥ-, hetave-, hetau-,"for a cause or reason","by reason of","on account of"[with genitive case or compound exempli gratia, 'for example' mama hetoḥ-or mad-dhetoḥ-,"on account of me"]; kaṃ hetum-or ko heṭuḥ-,"wherefore?""why?" ; yato hetoḥ-,"because"; anena hetunā-or iti hetoḥ-,"for this reason"; mṛtyu-hetave-,"in order to kill"; hetur alaukikaḥ-,"a supernatural cause"; in fine compositi or 'at the end of a compound' hetu-also ="having as a cause or motive","caused or effected or actuated or attracted or impelled by" exempli gratia, 'for example' karma-hetu-,"caused by the acts [of a former existence]"; māṃsa-hetu-,"attracted by [the smell of] flesh"; karma-phala-hetu-,"impelled by [the expectation of] the consequences of any act") etc. View this entry on the original dictionary page scan.
hi (see hay-) cl.5 P. () hin/oti- (Vedic or Veda also hinut/e-, h/invati-and hinv/ati-, te-; parasmE-pada hinvān/a-[with act. and pass. sense] ; h/ayat- : sg. hiṣe- ; perfect tense jighāya-, jighyuḥ- etc.; jighye-[with pass. sense] ; Aorist /ahema- /ahema-, ahyan-, heta- parasmE-pada hiyān/a-[with pass. sense] ; ahyam-[?], /ahait- ; ahaiṣīt- ; aheṣata- ; future hetā- grammar; heṣyati- etc.; infinitive mood -hy/e- ), to send forth, set in motion, impel, urge on, hasten on (A1.also intrans.) ; to stimulate or incite to (dative case) ; to assist or help to (dative case) ; to discharge, hurl, cast, shoot ; to convey, bring, procure ; to forsake, abandon, get rid of ; (hinvati-) to gladden, delight : Passive voice hīyate- (Aorist ahāyi-) grammar : Causal hāyuyati- (Aorist ajīhayat-) : Desiderative of Causal jihāpayiṣati- : Desiderative jighīṣati- : Intensive jeghīyate-, jeghayīti-, jegheti- View this entry on the original dictionary page scan.
ruh (see,1. rudh-) cl.1 P. ( ) r/ohati- (mc. also te-and ruhati-, te-; Vedic or Veda and Epic imperfect tense or Aorist aruhat-; Potential ruheyam-, -ruhethās-, -ruhemahi-; imperative ruha-, parasmE-pada r/uhāṇa-; perfect tense ruroha-, ruruh/uḥ- etc.; ruruhe- ; Aorist /arukṣat- etc.; future roḍhā- grammar; rokṣy/ati-, te- etc.; rohiṣye- ; infinitive mood roḍhum- etc.; rohitum- ; r/ohiṣyai- ; ind.p. rūḍhv/ā- , -r/uhya- etc.; -rūhya- ; -r/uham- ; -r/oham- ), to ascend, mount, climb ; to reach to, attain (a desire) ; to rise, spring up, grow, develop, increase, prosper, thrive etc. etc. (with na-,"to be useless or in vain" ) ; to grow together or over, cicatrize, heal (as a wound) etc.: Causal roh/ayati- or (later) ropayati-, te- (Aorist arūruhat-or arūrupat- grammar; Passive voice ropyate- Aorist aropi- ), to cause to ascend, raise up, elevate ; to place in or on, fix in, fasten to, direct towards (with accusative or locative case) ; to transfer to, commit, entrust (see ropita-) ; to put in the ground, plant, sow ; to lay out (a garden) ; to cause to grow, increase ; to cause to grow over or heal : Desiderative r/urukṣati- See ā-ruh-: Intensive roruhyate-, roroḍhi- grammar View this entry on the original dictionary page scan.
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āma आम a. [आम्यते ईषत् पच्यते; आ अम् कर्मणि घञ् Tv.] 1 Raw, uncooked, undressed (opp. पक्व) (oft. applied to the cow in the Veda; Rv.3.3.14.); आमान्नम् Ms.4.223; Y.1.287. -2 Unripe, immature; तुदन्त्या- मत्वचं दंशा मशका मत्कुणादयः Bhāg.3.31.27. -3 Unbaked, unannealed (as a jar); आमकुम्भ इवाम्भःस्थो विशीर्णः H.4.66. -4 Undigested. -म् 1 State of being raw; शनैः शनैर्जहुः पङ्कं स्थलान्यामं च वीरुधः Bhāg.1.2.39. -2 Constipation, passing hard excretion. -3 Grain freed from chaff. -मः 1 Disease; sickness. -2 Indigestion; आहारस्य रसः सारः यो न पक्वो$ग्निलाघवात् । आमसंज्ञां स लभते महाव्याधिसमाश्रयः ॥ Suśr. -Comp. -अतिसारः dysentery or diarrhœa caused by vitiated mucus in the abdomen (the excretion being in this case mixed with hard and fetid matter). आमातिसारे नो कार्य- मादौ संग्रहणं नृणाम् Suśr. -अद् a. eating raw flesh or food; आमादः क्ष्विङ्कास्त मदन्त्वेनीः Rv.1.87.7. -अन्नम् undressed rice. -आशयः [आमस्यापक्वान्नस्याशयः] 'receptacle of undigested food', the upper part of the belly to the navel, stomach. -कुम्भः a jar of unbaked clay; H.4.66. -गन्धि n. smelling of raw meat of a burning corpse. -गन्धिकम् the smell of raw meat. -ज्वरः a kind of fever; cf. स्वेद्यमामज्वरं प्राज्ञः को$म्भसा परिषिञ्चति Śi.2.54. -त्वच् a. of tender skin. -पाकः1 a preliminary stage of the disease called dropsy. -2 A method of mellowing or ripening a tumour; Suśr.. -पात्रम् an unannealed vessel; Av.8.1.28; विनाशं व्रजति क्षिप्रमाम- पात्रमिवाम्भसि Ms.3.179. -पीनसम् running at the nose, defluxion. -पेशाः Grains pounded in a raw condition. -मांसाशिन् m. a cannibal, an eater of raw flesh. -रक्तम् dysentery. -रसः imperfect chyme. -वातः constipation, torpor of the bowels attended with flatulence and intumescence. -शूलः pain of indigestion, colic. -श्राद्धम् a Śrāddha performed with uncooked food; आपद्यनग्नौ तीर्थे च चन्द्रसूर्यग्रहे तथा । आमश्राद्धं द्विजैः कार्यं शूद्रेण च सदैव हि ॥ Prāchetasa.
vahiṣka वहिष्क a. Outer, external. वहेटकः vahēṭakḥ वहेडुकः vahēḍukḥ वहैडुकः vahaiḍukḥ वहेटकः वहेडुकः वहैडुकः The Bibhītaka tree.
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ya prn. rel. (n. -d) who, that, which, what: nearly always followed by the ordinary correlative tad (± etad or idam) or less frequently idam (m. ayam), adas (m. asau), îdris, tâdrisa, etâvat (tathâ sts. corresponding to the n. yad); occasionally either the rel. or the corr. is dropped. Ya is sts. inaccurately employed in the sense of if any (one). Uses of the relative calling for special mention are the following: 1. Ya is often added (without the copula) to emphasize a subject (e.g. âtma parityâgena yad âsritânam rakshanam, tan nîtividâm na sammatam, protection of dependents at the sacrifice of one's own life is not approved by moralists).Sts. it is thus used without emphasis by the side of a simple subject (e. g. andhah sthaviras ka yah, a blind man and one who is old); rarely a nm. rel. of this kind=an ac. (e.g. sarvân rasân apo heta pasavo ye ka mânushâh, he should avoid selling all sorts of condiments, cattle, and human beings). The n. sg. yad of this emphatic rel. is frequently employed without regard to gender or number, when it may be translated by as for, as regards (e.g. asidhâ râvratam idam manye yad arinâ saha samvâ sah, as for dwelling with an enemy, that I consider as hard as the sword-blade vow); before a noun this yad=that is to say (Br.). Immediately following oratio recta ending with iti yad=at the thought that (cp. cj. yad). 2. Two relatives often occur in the same sentence, when the second may be translated by any (e.g. yad rokate yasmai, bhavet tat tasya sundaram, what pleases any one, that to him is beautiful). 3. The meaning of the rel. when repeated (sts. separated by hi) is generalised, ya ya being=whoever, whichever, whatever (followed by the doubled or single corr. tad). 4. Ya is often combined with other prns.: (a) w. tvam, sa, esha, ayam, asau; (b) w. aham (tvam, etc.): yo &zip; ham, I who=since I, or (after a question) that I; (c) w. tad, any soever: yad vâ tad vâ, any, any kind of; anything; (d) w. tvad=or any other (Br., rare); (e) w. intr. ka + ka (V., C., common), + kid (C., very common), + kid api (C., not common), + kana (E., rare), + vâ (C., rare), or + api (C., late, not yet in Manu), immediately following or sts. sepa rated (m. yah kás ka, kas kid, kas kid api, kas kana, ko vâ, or ko &zip; pi, n. yad kim ka, kim kid, kim kid api, kim kana, kim vâ or kim api), whoever, whatever, any soever, any one, no matter who.
saṃpriya a. mutually dear, being on good terms with (in.; V.); n. satisfaction (E., rare); -prîti, f. joy, delight, in (lc., --°ree;); good will, friendship (with, for, in. ± saha), love for (g., lc.); -preshana, n.sending, de spatch (sts. pl.); dismission; -praishá, m. summons, direction to an officiating priest (V.); -plava, m. flowing together of waters, flood, deluge; swell, surge (of the sea); dense mass, multitude, shower; tumult (of battle, --°ree;); submersion, ruin; -phulla, pp. expanded, blooming; -pheta, m. altercation.
subhaga a. having a blessed lot, highly favoured, fortunate, happy; beloved, dear (esp. wife); charming, amiable; lovely, beautiful (also of inanimate objects; vc., esp. f. common as an address); nice (fellow, ironical); suitable for (--°ree;, rare): -m, ad. charmingly; highly, very (rare): â, f. be loved wife; (á)-m-karana, a. (î) making happy (V.); charming (C.); (a)-tvá, n. wel fare, happiness (V.); popularity, dearness (esp. of a wife; C.); -mânin, a. thinking oneself popular; -m-manya, a. considering oneself happy or beloved: -bhâva, m. self conceit; -½âkheta-bhûmi, a. having fine hunting-grounds: -tva, n. abst. n.
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jani These words appear to denote ‘wife,’ usually applying to her in relation to her husband (Pati). The more general sense of ‘woman ’ is doubtful; for when Usas is called a fair Janī, ‘wife ’ may be meant, and the other passage cited for this sense by Delbriick, which refers to the begetting of children, seems to demand the sense of ‘wives.’ Since the words usually appear in the plural, it is possible they may refer not to ‘wives’ proper, but to Hetairai. This is, how¬ever, rendered unlikely because the Rigveda uses the phrase patyur janitvam, denoting ‘wifehood to a husband,’ as well as the expression janayo na patnlh,β ‘like wives (who are) mistresses,’ besides containing passages in which the word has reference to marriage. The singular occurs in the dialogue of Yama and Yamī.
dharma Are the regular words, the latter in the Rigveda, and both later, for ‘ law ’ or ‘ custom.’ But there is very little evidence in the early literature as to the administra­tion of justice or the code of law followed. On the other hand, the Dharma Sūtras contain full particulars.Criminal Law.—The crimes recognized in Vedic literature vary greatly in importance, while there is no distinction adopted in principle between real crimes and what now are regarded as fanciful bodily defects or infringements of merely conventional practices. The crimes enumerated include the slaying of an embryo (
pati Under these words denoting primarily, as the evidence collected in the St. Petersburg Dictionary shows, ‘ lord ’ and ‘ lady,’ and so * husband ’ and * wife,’ it is convenient to consider the marital relations of the Vedic community. Child Marriage.—Marriage in the early Vedic texts appears essentially as a union of two persons of full development. This is shown by the numerous references to unmarried girls who grow old in the house of their fathers (amā-jur), and who adorn themselves in desire of marriage, as well as to the paraphernalia of spells and potions used in the Atharvavedic tradition to compel the love of man or woman respectively, while even the Rigveda itself seems to present us with a spell by which a lover seeks to send all the household to sleep when he visits his beloved. Child wives first occur regularly in the Sūtra period, though it is still uncertain to what extent the rule of marriage before puberty there obtained. The marriage ritual also quite clearly presumes that the marriage is a real and not a nominal one: an essential feature is the taking of the bride to her husband’s home, and the ensuing cohabitation. Limitations on Marriage.—It is difficult to say with certainty within what limits marriage was allowed. The dialogue of Yama and Yam! in the Rigveda seems clearly to point to a prohibition of the marriage of brother and sister. It can hardly be said, as Weber thinks, to point to a practice that was once in use and later became antiquated. In the Gobhila Grhya Sūtra and the Dharma Sūtras are found prohibitions against marriage in the Gotra (‘ family ’) or within six degrees on the mother’s or father’s side, but in the śatapatha Brāh-mana marriage is allowed in the third or fourth generation, the former being allowed, according to Harisvamin, by the Kanvas, and the second by the Saurāstras, while the Dāksi- nātyas allowed marriage with the daughter of the mother’s brother or the son of the father’s sister, but presumably not with the daughter of the mother’s sister or the son of the father’s brother. The prohibition of marriage within the Gotra cannot then have existed, though naturally marriages outside the Gotra were frequent. Similarity of caste was also not an essential to marriage, as hypergamy was permitted even by the Dharma Sūtras, so that a Brāhmana could marry wives of any lower caste, a Ksatriya wives of the two lowest castes as well as of his own caste, a Vaiśya a Sūdrā as well as a Vaiśyā, although the Sūdrā marriages were later disapproved in toto. Instances of such intermarriage are common in the Epic, and are viewed as normal in the Brhaddevatā. It was considered proper that the younger brothers and sisters should not anticipate their elders by marrying before them. The later Samhitās and Brāhmanas present a series of names expressive of such anticipation, censuring as sinful those who bear them. These terms are the pari-vividāna, or perhaps agre-dadhus, the man who, though a younger brother, marries before his elder brother, the latter being then called the parivitta; the agre-didhisu, the man who weds a younger daughter while her elder sister is still unmarried; and the Didhisū-pati, who is the husband of the latter. The passages do not explicitly say that the exact order of birth must always be followed, but the mention of the terms shows that the order was often broken. Widow Remarriage. The remarriage of a widow was apparently permitted. This seems originally to have taken the form of the marriage of the widow to the brother or other nearest kinsman of the dead man in order to produce children. At any rate, the ceremony is apparently alluded to in a funeral hymn of the Rigveda ; for the alternative explanation, which sees in the verse a reference to the ritual of the Purusamedha (‘human sacrifice’), although accepted by Hillebrandt and Delbruck, is not at all probable, while the ordinary view is supported by the Sūtra evidence. Moreover, another passage of the Rigveda clearly refers to the marriage of the widow and the husband’s brother {devr), which constitutes what the Indians later knew as Niyoga. This custom was probably not followed except in cases where no son was already born. This custom was hardly remarriage in the strict sense, since the brother might—so far as appears—be already married himself. In the Atharvaveda, a verse refers to a charm which would secure the reunion, in the next world, of a wife and her second husband. Though, as Delbruck thinks, this very possibly refers to a case in which the first husband was still alive, but was impotent or had lost caste (patita), still it is certain that the later Dharma Sūtras began to recognize ordinary remarriage in case of the death of the first husband Pischel finds some evidence in the Rigveda to the effect that a woman could remarry if her husband disappeared and could not be found or heard of. Polygamy. A Vedic Indian could have more than one wife. This is proved clearly by many passages in the Rigveda; Manu, according to the Maitrāyanī Samhitā, had ten wives ; and the Satapatha Brāhmana explains polygamy by a characteristic legend. Moreover, the king regularly has four wives attributed to him, the Mahisī, the Parivrktī, the Vāvātā, and the Pālāgalī. The Mahisī appears to be the chief wife, being the first, one married according to the śata¬patha Brāhmana. The Parivrktī, ‘ the neglected,’ is explained by Weber and Pischel as one that has had no son. The Vāvātā is ‘the favourite,’ while the Pālāgalī is, according to Weber, the daughter of the last of the court officials. The names are curious, and not very intelligible, but the evidence points to the wife first wedded alone being a wife in the fullest sense. This view is supported by the fact emphasized by Delbruck, that in the sacrifice the Patnī is usually mentioned in the singular, apparent exceptions being due to some mythological reason. Zimmer is of opinion that polygamy is dying out in the Rigvedic period, monogamy being developed from pologamy; Weber, however, thinks that polygamy is secondary, a view that is supported by more recent anthropology. Polyandry.—On the other hand, polyandry is not Vedic. There is no passage containing any clear reference to such a custom. The most that can be said is that in the Rigveda and the Atharvaveda verses are occasionally found in which husbands are mentioned in relation to a single wife. It is difficult to be certain of the correct explanation of each separate instance of this mode of expression; but even if Weber’s view, that the plural is here used majestatis causa, is not accepted, Delbruck’s explanation by mythology is probably right. In other passages the plural is simply generic. Marital Relations.—Despite polygamy, however, there is ample evidence that the marriage tie was not, as Weber has suggested, lightly regarded as far as the fidelity of the wife was concerned. There is, however, little trace of the husband’s being expected to be faithful as a matter of morality. Several passages, indeed, forbid, with reference to ritual abstinence, intercourse with the strī of another. This may imply that adultery on the husband’s part was otherwise regarded as venial. But as the word strī includes all the ‘womenfolk,’ daughters and slaves, as well as wife, the conclusion can hardly be drawn that intercourse with another man’s ‘wife’ was normally regarded with indifference. The curious ritual of the Varunapraghāsās, in which the wife of the sacrificer is questioned as to her lovers, is shown by Delbruck to be a part of a rite meant to expiate unchastity on the part of a wife, not as a normal question for a sacrificer to put to his own wife. Again, Yājñavalkya’s doctrine in the Satapatha Brāhmana, which seems to assert that no one cares if a wife is unchaste (parah-pumsā) or not, really means that no one cares if the wife is away from the men who are sacrificing, as the wives of the gods are apart from them during the particular rite in question. Monogamy is also evidently approved, so that some higher idea of morality was in course of formation. On the other hand, no Vedic text gives us the rule well known to other Indo-Germanic peoples that the adulterer taken in the act can be killed with impunity, though the later legal literature has traces of this rule. There is also abundant evidence that the standard of ordinary sexual morality was not high. Hetairai. In the Rigveda there are many references to illegitimate love and to the abandonment of the offspring of such unions,ββ especially in the case of a protege of Indra, often mentioned as the parāvrkta or parāvrj. The ‘son of a maiden ’ (kumārī-putra) is already spoken of in the Vājasaneyi Samhitā. Such a person appears with a metronymic in the Upanisad period: this custom may be the origin of metro- nymics such as those which make up a great part of the lists of teachers (Vamśas) of the Brhadāranyaka Upanisad. The Vājasaneyi Samhitā refers to illicit unions of śūdra and Arya, both male and female, besides giving in its list of victims at the Purusamedha, or ‘human sacrifice,’ several whose designations apparently mean ‘ courtesan (atītvarī) and ‘ procuress of abortion ’ (
rāmā In a few passages seems to have the sense of a hetaera.
svasṛ Is the regular word from the Rigveda onwards for ‘sister.’ Like the word Bhrātr, the term sister can be applied The sister stood in a close relation to her brother. If the father was dead or feeble, the sister was dependent on her brother and on his wife, as appears from the Rigveda and the Aitareya Brāhmaṇa. Moreover, maidens without brothers were apt to find marriage difficult, and to degenerate into Hetairai;6 but it is not certain whether this was due, as Zimmer thinks, to brothers being required to arrange marriages for orphan girls, or because sonless fathers were anxious to make their daughters Putrikās, in order that they themselves, instead of the husbands, should count the daughters’ sons as their own. See also Jāmi.
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agna itthetarā giraḥ # RV.6.16.16b; SV.1.7b; 2.55b; VS.26.13b; MS.4.12.1b: 177.2; KS.2.14b; AB.3.49.2; JB.3.33b; śB.2.2.3.23b.
ato dyāvāpṛthivī aprathetām # RV.10.149.2d.
anavahāyāsmān devayānena pathā (TS. patheta) sukṛtāṃ loke sīdata # TS.1.4.43.2; MS.1.3.37: 44.2; 4.8.2: 109.6. See next.
andho achetaḥ (TS.Apś. 'chetaḥ) # VS.8.54; TS.4.4.9.1; KS.34.14; Apś.12.1.3; 17.6.3.
anyatrāsman marutas tan ni dhetana # TB.3.7.11.2d; Aś.3.13.18d; Apś.3.11.2d.
anyaṃ (VSṃS.KS.śB. anyāṃs) te asmat tapantu hetayaḥ # VS.17.7c,11c,15c; 36.20c; TS.4.6.1.3c (bis),5c; 5.4.4.5; MS.2.10.1c (ter): 131.13; 132.2,14; 3.3.6: 39.3; KS.17.17c (quinq.); śB.9.1.2.28c; 2.1.2,17; Aś.2.12.2c (bis). Cf. under anyaṃ kṛṇu-.
anyām icheta tarhi saḥ # AVś.12.4.13b.
artheta sthādhvagataḥ # Apś.16.32.5; arthetaḥ sthānvagataḥ KS.39.1. See prec. two.
avīvṛdhata # MS.4.13.9 (quater): 212.4,5,6,8; śB.1.9.1.9,10; TB.3.5.10.2 (bis),3 (ter),4 (bis); Aś.1.9.1; 3.4.15; 6.11.5 (cf. comm.); śś.1.14.6--8,13,15; 6.1.5 (cf. comm.); Mś.5.1.4.28. Cf. avīvṛdhanta, and avīvṛdhetām.
avīvṛdhat puroḍāśena (VSK. avīvṛdhata purolāśena) # VS.28.23,46; VSK.30.17,46. Cf. avīvṛdhanta puroḍāśaiḥ, and avīvṛdhetāṃ puroḍāśena.
avīvṛdhanta # MS.4.13.9: 212.7; śB.1.9.1.10; TB.3.5.10.4; Aś.1.9.5; 3.4.15 (comm.); śś.1.14.14; 6.1.5 (cf. comm.). Cf. avīvṛdhata, and avīvṛdhetām.
avīvṛdhanta puroḍāśaiḥ (VSK. -lāśaiḥ) # VS.21.60; VSK.23.59; KS.19.13. Cf. prec., next, avīvṛdhat puroḍāśena, and avīvṛdhetāṃ puroḍāśena.
ād id dyāvāpṛthivī aprathetām # RV.10.82.1d; VS.17.25d; TS.4.6.2.4d; MS.2.10.3d: 134.2. See yad id dyāvā-.
ād īm aśvaṃ na hetāraḥ (SV.JB. hetāram) # RV.9.62.6a; SV.2.360a; JB.3.119a.
āśuṃ jetāraṃ hetāraṃ rathītamam # RV.8.99.7c; AVś.20.105.3c; SV.1.283c.
ut tiṣṭhetaḥ kim ichantīdam āgāḥ # AVś.14.2.19a. P: ut tiṣṭhetaḥ Kauś.77.16.
ūrmiṃ pra heta ya ubhe iyarti # RV.10.30.9b.
jīvān no abhi dhetana # RV.8.67.5a; N.6.27a.
tasmin (Vaitṃś. tasmiṃs) tad eno vasavo ni dhetana # RV.10.37.12d; Tā.10.60d; Vait.23.12d; Mś.2.5.4.9d.
tāṃ pathetaḥ pra hiṇmasi # AVś.5.31.10b.
divi jyotir ajaram (MS. uttamam) ārabhetām (MS. -thām) # MS.1.4.3d: 51.5; TB.3.7.5.11d; Apś.3.9.10d. See dive jyotir.
namas te hetaye tapuṣe ca kṛṇmaḥ # AVś.1.13.3b.
bādhatāṃ dveṣo abhayaṃ (AVś.7.91.1c, abhayaṃ naḥ) kṛṇotu # RV.6.47.12c; 10.131.6c; AVś.7.91.1c; 20.125.6c; VS.20.51c; TS.1.7.13.4c; MS.4.12.5c: 191.5; KS.8.16c. See bādhetāṃ etc.
bāhvos (TS. bāhuvos) tava hetayaḥ # VS.16.53b; TS.4.5.10.5b. See hetayas tava.
bhīmā indrasya hetayaḥ # AVś.4.37.8a,9a; AVP.12.8.3a.
bhīmās te takman hetayaḥ # AVś.5.22.10c; AVP.5.21.6c; 12.1.10c.
mṛgāṇāṃ na hetayo yanti cemāḥ # RV.1.190.4c.
yad id dyāvāpṛthivī aprathetām # KS.18.2c. See ād id etc.
yam ādityā ahetana # RV.8.47.6d.
yās te sahasraṃ hetayaḥ # VS.16.52c; TS.4.5.10.5c; MS.2.9.9c: 128.4; KS.17.16c.
ye aprathetām amitebhir ojobhiḥ # TS.4.7.15.6a; MS.3.16.5a: 192.5; KS.22.15a. See next two, and sacetasau ye aprathethām.
     Vedabase Search  
117 results
     
hetau and reason for existenceSB 10.46.32-33
hetavaḥ causesBG 18.15
SB 1.5.34
SB 10.40.2
SB 11.13.4
SB 11.15.33
SB 4.1.16
SB 4.22.9
SB 4.8.28
SB 6.3.4
SB 6.4.45
hetavaḥ due to the cause ofSB 1.10.6
hetavaḥ fruitive activities, which are the cause of future rewardsSB 11.13.31
hetavaḥ sourcesSB 10.86.56
hetavaḥ the causesSB 10.24.22
SB 10.27.5
SB 11.22.12
SB 11.8.38
SB 12.4.36
SB 12.8.45
SB 3.12.21
SB 3.9.16
SB 8.24.29
hetavaḥ the original causesSB 5.25.9
hetave for the purpose ofSB 10.17.18
SB 8.1.14
hetave for the sake ofSB 3.32.5
hetave the original causeSB 8.16.30
hetave the root causeSB 1.17.28
hetave to causeSB 7.1.42
hetave to the root causeSB 10.16.48
hetave to the sourceSB 10.40.29
hetave to the total causeSB 10.16.41
abhilabheta particularly receivedSB 2.3.23
ārabheta should beginSB 6.19.2-3
ārti-hetavaḥ the cause of all inauspiciousnessSB 3.17.4
āślatheta becomes slackenedSB 5.5.9
tulya-āyāsa-hetavaḥ who made an equal endeavorSB 8.8.39-40
bādheta hindersSB 8.20.2
bhetavyam should be afraidSB 8.6.25
bhetavyam to be fearedCC Madhya 11.11
kula-daiva-hetave for the good fortune of the dynastySB 9.5.9
duńheta both of themCC Madhya 6.222
guṇa-hetavaḥ are manifested from the material mode of goodnessSB 11.15.3
phala-hetavaḥ those desiring fruitive resultsBG 2.49
ārti-hetavaḥ the cause of all inauspiciousnessSB 3.17.4
sakala-loka-sthiti-hetavaḥ the causes of the maintenance of the different planets within the universeSB 5.20.39
prīti-hetavaḥ sources of pleasureSB 6.14.13
jñāna-hetavaḥ very learned persons who preach all over the worldSB 6.15.12-15
tulya-āyāsa-hetavaḥ who made an equal endeavorSB 8.8.39-40
nāśa-hetavaḥ having the definite purpose of killing ThemSB 10.11.23
guṇa-hetavaḥ are manifested from the material mode of goodnessSB 11.15.3
sukha-hetave for happinessSB 3.30.2
sarva-pratyaya-hetave who is the solution to all doubts (and without whose help one cannot solve all doubts and inabilities)SB 8.3.14
yoga-hetave the original master of all mystic powerSB 8.16.33
kula-daiva-hetave for the good fortune of the dynastySB 9.5.9
naraka-hetave for going to hellSB 9.10.28
phala-hetave for the sake of fruitSB 10.24.10
vibhava-hetave for the sake of the opulencesSB 11.2.53
iccheta should desireSB 11.8.1
īheta she would desireSB 4.25.56
īheta may performSB 6.3.33
īheta endeavors forSB 6.10.8
īheta should try to obtainSB 7.15.15
īheta should performSB 7.15.66
īheta should endeavorSB 11.8.4
jñāna-hetavaḥ very learned persons who preach all over the worldSB 6.15.12-15
kula-daiva-hetave for the good fortune of the dynastySB 9.5.9
labheta gainsSB 1.5.14
labheta could meetSB 3.19.27
labheta can achieveSB 4.21.40
labheta can achieveSB 5.5.15
labheta can getSB 6.19.25
labheta may obtainSB 7.7.21
labheta may attainSB 7.9.50
labheta can achieveSB 10.44.47
labheta will attainSB 11.31.28
pācheta' lāgiyā followingCC Madhya 22.159
sakala-loka-sthiti-hetavaḥ the causes of the maintenance of the different planets within the universeSB 5.20.39
naraka-hetave for going to hellSB 9.10.28
nāśa-hetavaḥ having the definite purpose of killing ThemSB 10.11.23
pācheta' lāgiyā followingCC Madhya 22.159
paṭheta readsSB 7.10.47
phala-hetavaḥ those desiring fruitive resultsBG 2.49
phala-hetave for the sake of fruitSB 10.24.10
sarva-pratyaya-hetave who is the solution to all doubts (and without whose help one cannot solve all doubts and inabilities)SB 8.3.14
prīti-hetavaḥ sources of pleasureSB 6.14.13
rākheta were keptCC Madhya 3.53
saheta can tolerateSB 1.16.35
saheta can tolerateSB 3.2.19
saheta can tolerateSB 10.68.39
sakala-loka-sthiti-hetavaḥ the causes of the maintenance of the different planets within the universeSB 5.20.39
samedheta would flourishSB 3.21.55
samīheta desireSB 5.5.16
samīheta one should endeavorSB 11.18.34
sarva-pratyaya-hetave who is the solution to all doubts (and without whose help one cannot solve all doubts and inabilities)SB 8.3.14
sakala-loka-sthiti-hetavaḥ the causes of the maintenance of the different planets within the universeSB 5.20.39
sukha-hetave for happinessSB 3.30.2
tiṣṭheta may standSB 10.60.57
tiṣṭheta can remainSB 11.24.28
tiṣṭheta he standsSB 11.25.8
tulya-āyāsa-hetavaḥ who made an equal endeavorSB 8.8.39-40
upalabheta could feelSB 4.28.46
upalabheta one can perceiveSB 7.9.34
upatiṣṭheta one should worshipSB 5.23.8
upatiṣṭheta should offer prayersSB 6.18.53
utsaheta can bearSB 6.10.4
utsaheta is ableSB 7.6.9
utsaheta can bearSB 10.47.48
uttiṣṭheta can come outSB 7.15.35
vardheta may increaseSB 3.18.25
vibhava-hetave for the sake of the opulencesSB 11.2.53
viṣaheta carrySB 3.16.9
viṣaheta and tolerates (such itching)SB 7.9.45
viṣaheta can tolerateNoI 1
viśrambheta can have faith inSB 3.3.23
yoga-hetave the original master of all mystic powerSB 8.16.33
     Wordnet Search "heta" has 18 results.
     

heta

khaṇḍanīya, bhedya, bhaṅgya, khaṇḍya, bhetavya, bhaṅgura, lopya, viśīrya   

yasya khaṇḍaṃ kartuṃ śakyate।

dṛśyavastuni khaṇḍanīyāni santi।

heta

abhedya, abhaṅgya, akhaṇḍanīya, akhaṇḍya, abhetavya, abhaṅgura, alopya, aviśīrya   

yasya khaṇḍanaṃ na bhavati।

bhavataḥ tarkaḥ abhedyaḥ।

heta

adhama, pratikṛṣṭa, avamaḥ, nikṛṣṭa, arvā, rephaḥ, yāpyaḥ, kutsitaḥ, avadyaḥ, kupūyaḥ, kheṭaḥ, garhyaḥ, aṇakaḥ, repaḥ, aramaḥ, āṇakaḥ, anakaḥ   

yad atyantam apakṛṣṭam asti।

tava adhamāni kṛtyāni dṛṣṭvā klāntaḥ aham।

heta

mṛgayā, ācchodanam, mṛgavyam, ākheṭaḥ   

vanyapaśvādīnām hananam।

prācīnakālīnaḥ nṛpaḥ vaneṣu mṛgayām akarot।

heta

kalahaḥ, vādaḥ, yuddham, āyodhanam, janyam, pradhanam, pravidāraṇam, mṛdham, āskandanam, saṅkhyam, samīkam, sāmparāyikam, samaraḥ, anīkaḥ, raṇaḥ, vigrahaḥ, samprahāraḥ, kaliḥ, sphoṭaḥ, saṃyugaḥ, āhavaḥ, samitiḥ, samit, ājiḥ, śamīkam, saṃspheṭaḥ   

kasyāpi viṣaye parasparaviṣaye vā prayuktaṃ dūṣitaṃ jalpanam।

saḥ kalahasya kāraṇaṃ jñātuṃ icchati।

heta

ākheṭavanam   

ākheṭārthe vartamānaṃ vanam।

prācīne kāle rājānaḥ mṛgayārthe ākheṭavane gacchanti sma।

heta

pallī, padraḥ, kheṭakaḥ, nivasathaḥ   

kṣudragrāmaḥ।

nadītaṭe ekā pallī santi।

heta

nasotthaḥ, kheṭaḥ, nāsikāmalam   

nāsikāyāḥ niryāsamānaḥ dravaḥ।

śaitye nāsikāyāḥ nasotthaḥ āyāti।

heta

tṛṇam, abdaḥ, kacchāntaruhā, kāśakaḥ, kutapaḥ, kuśaḥ, kaivartī, kheṭam   

kṛṣyām dhānyakṣupaiḥ saha anuruhāḥ kṣudrakṣupāḥ।

kṛṣakaḥ kṛṣīkṣetrāt tṛṇam utpāṭayati।

heta

vyādhaḥ, ākheṭakaḥ, ākheṭikaḥ, kulikaḥ, kṣāntaḥ, khaṭṭikaḥ, gulikaḥ, drohāṭaḥ, nirmanyuḥ, nirvairaḥ, naiṣādaḥ, pāparddhikaḥ, balākaḥ, mārgikaḥ, mṛgadyūḥ, lubdhakaḥ, vyādhakaḥ, śvagaṇikaḥ, saunikaḥ   

yaḥ mṛgayāṃ karoti।

śvāpadaḥ na prāptaḥ ataḥ vyādhaḥ riktahastaḥ eva pratyāgacchat।

heta

lubdhaka, lubdha, ākheṭaka, kulika, tīvara, drohāṭa, mārgika   

ākheṭasambandhī।

vyādhena śaśasya ākheṭārthe svasya lubdhakaḥ śvā preṣitaḥ।

heta

lakṣam, ākheṭaḥ   

mṛgayāyāṃ vyāpāditāḥ paśavaḥ pakṣiṇaśca।

lakṣam āhatya vṛkṣeṣu nilīnam।

heta

rānīkheta   

kumāuvibhāgasya almoḍāmaṇḍale vartamānaṃ prasiddhaṃ paryaṭanasthalam।

rānīkhetasya prākṛtikaṃ dṛśyaṃ manoharam asti।

heta

ṣaṭkheṭakaḥ   

ekaṃ nagaram ।

ṣaṭkheṭakasya ullekhaḥ vivaraṇapustikāyām asti

heta

kheṭakapuram   

ekaṃ nagaram ।

kheṭakapurasya varṇanaṃ kośe vartate

heta

kheṭapīṭhamālā   

ekaḥ khagolaśāstrīyagranthaḥ ।

kheṭapīṭhamālāyāḥ varṇanaṃ kośe vartate

heta

kheṭabodhaḥ   

ekaḥ khagolaśāstrīyagranthaḥ ।

kheṭabodhasya varṇanaṃ kośe vartate

heta

kheṭabhūṣaṇam   

ekaḥ khagolaśāstrīyagranthaḥ ।

kheṭabhūṣaṇasya varṇanaṃ kośe vartate

Parse Time: 3.056s Search Word: heta Input Encoding: IAST: heta